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646Re: [Glaucus] Re: Red Wharf Bay beachcomb

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  • shdbone@lineone.net
    Mar 27, 2008
      Ah well, but if you ever find another .....!

      SH-D ArchaeoZoology
      http://www.shd-archzoo.co.uk
      All messages virus checked by ZoneAlarm
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Daniel Ward
      To: Glaucus@...
      Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2008 9:29 PM
      Subject: [Glaucus] Re: Red Wharf Bay beachcomb



      Sheila,

      I didn't I'm afraid...

      --- In Glaucus@..., <shdbone@...> wrote:
      >
      > Don't suppose you picked up the chough?......
      > Sheila
      >
      > SH-D ArchaeoZoology
      > http://www.shd-archzoo.co.uk
      > All messages virus checked by ZoneAlarm
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Daniel Ward
      > To: Glaucus@...
      > Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2008 1:43 PM
      > Subject: [Glaucus] Red Wharf Bay beachcomb
      >
      >
      >
      > After a recent bout of northerlies here in North Wales I took the dog
      > for a walk down on Red Wharf Bay (now two days ago, 26/3) and found
      > all sorts of things washed up. Much of the material was deposited
      > across the entire intertidal to the east of the Bay, but more
      > concentrated on the strandline towards the West. Typically, the one
      > time there was a lot to look at, I didn't bother to take my camera. I
      > did bring a few specimens back to photograph, but I was in a bit of a
      > rush so I had to stick them in the freezer, and, as I'm away for a
      > week or so, I won't be able to snap them for a while...
      >
      > Brittle stars (various species) were paricularly abundant on the upper
      > shore, with patches a couple of inches (or more) thick. Asterias
      > rubens were also very abundant, as a rough guess > 5-10 per metre
      > square (there was a lot of them!).
      >
      > Species such as Astropecten irregularis, Echinocardium cordatum,
      > Alcyonium digitatum, masked crabs (Corystes spp.) and various
      > sipunculids were also washed up in considerable numbers, as were
      > various elamsobranch eggcases, a couple of which I brought back to ID.
      >
      > Of the more unusual species, I found three angular crabs (Goneplax
      > rhomboides), a small conger eel (approx 50cm long) and a dead chough
      > (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax).
      >
      > Hopefully some of this is of interest...
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Dan
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





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