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Cornish Moray - first this century

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  • DOUGLAS HERDSON
    Hi All   You may be interested to see this report, if you have not already -
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 15, 2009
      Hi All
       
      You may be interested to see this report, if you have not already - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1192763/First-moray-eel-caught-Britain-pulled-Cornish-coast.html#.
       
      Unfortunately it is inaccurate  - This is actually the tenth Mediterranean Moray Muraena helena to be caught in British and Irish waters; the first was caught on a line at Polperro in Cornwall in 1834.  (One was also found off Ostend, Belgium in 1937.)  Also its actual weight was 3.8 kg and length 104 cm. They are a North East Atlantic fish being found from Senegal to the English Channel (and also in the Mediterranean).  They are not a sign of global warming, but a warm water eel that is rare at the northern limit of its distribution.  If climate change does continue to raise the sea temperatures around our coasts they may become commoner.
       
      My report comes from Dave Munday of the MFA Fisheries Office in Newlyn who gives the position as  ICES area VIIh square 27E4 - approx. 49  20’N  006 30’ W.
       
      The literature, most notably Wheeler, Merrett and Quigley (2004) gives three previous Cornish records (all in the nineteenth century), one from Ostend, one Herm and one Irish; however I have checked through the records held by the Newlyn fisheries office and
      find that a further three were landed to Newlyn in the 1990s, and Paul Gainey reports one off Land's End in 1989.
       
      regards, Doug
       Doug Herdson
      Marine Fish Information Services
      94 Dunstone View
      Plymstock
      Plymouth. PL9 8QW
      Email: Douglas.Herdson@...
      Telephone: +44(0)1752 405155

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • shdbone@lineone.net
      Thanks Doug, mine of information as always! this one is going to be useful in teaching rare but UK fish remains v imported foods (archaeological that is) By
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 15, 2009
        Thanks Doug, mine of information as always! this one is going to be useful in teaching 'rare but UK fish remains v imported foods' (archaeological that is) By the way where can one get the Wheeler et al - cant find it listed anywhere, should I ask Declan?
        Sheila
        SH-D ArchaeoZoology
        http://www.shd-archzoo.co.uk
        All messages virus checked by ZoneAlarm
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: DOUGLAS HERDSON
        To: Cornish Wildlife ; British Marine Wildlife
        Cc: Matt Slatter ; James Wright ; raymond dennis ; Rory Goodall ; Ellie Connolly
        Sent: Monday, June 15, 2009 5:53 PM
        Subject: [Glaucus] Cornish Moray - first this century





        Hi All

        You may be interested to see this report, if you have not already - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1192763/First-moray-eel-caught-Britain-pulled-Cornish-coast.html#.

        Unfortunately it is inaccurate - This is actually the tenth Mediterranean Moray Muraena helena to be caught in British and Irish waters; the first was caught on a line at Polperro in Cornwall in 1834. (One was also found off Ostend, Belgium in 1937.) Also its actual weight was 3.8 kg and length 104 cm. They are a North East Atlantic fish being found from Senegal to the English Channel (and also in the Mediterranean). They are not a sign of global warming, but a warm water eel that is rare at the northern limit of its distribution. If climate change does continue to raise the sea temperatures around our coasts they may become commoner.

        My report comes from Dave Munday of the MFA Fisheries Office in Newlyn who gives the position as ICES area VIIh square 27E4 - approx. 49 20’N 006 30’ W.

        The literature, most notably Wheeler, Merrett and Quigley (2004) gives three previous Cornish records (all in the nineteenth century), one from Ostend, one Herm and one Irish; however I have checked through the records held by the Newlyn fisheries office and
        find that a further three were landed to Newlyn in the 1990s, and Paul Gainey reports one off Land's End in 1989.

        regards, Doug
        Doug Herdson
        Marine Fish Information Services
        94 Dunstone View
        Plymstock
        Plymouth. PL9 8QW
        Email: Douglas.Herdson@...
        Telephone: +44(0)1752 405155

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • douglas.herdson@btinternet.com
        Thanks Doug, mine of information as always! this one is going to be useful in teaching rare but UK fish remains v imported foods (archaeological that is) By
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 16, 2009
          Thanks Doug, mine of information as always! this one is going to be useful in teaching 'rare but UK fish remains v imported foods' (archaeological that is) By the way where can one get the Wheeler et al - cant find it listed anywhere, should I ask Declan?
          Sheila
          SH-D ArchaeoZoology
          http://www.shd-archzoo.co.uk

          This reference is to "Additional records and notes for Wheeler's (1992) List of Common and Scientific Names of Fishes of the British Isles." by A.C. Wheeler, N.R. Merrett and D.T.G Quigley - it was published as a supplement to the Journal of Fish Biology Vol.65 Supplement B(40 pages). The original Wheeler list was supplement A to Vol. 41. An Academic library should have them.

          good luck, Doug
        • G MOFFAT
          Its rather a poor picture and has a bad press. 1. Can anyone id the species of Moray.  2. while diving in Teneriffe and Saudi Arabia i came across dozens of
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 19, 2009
            Its rather a poor picture and has a bad press.
            1. Can anyone id the species of Moray. 
            2. while diving in Teneriffe and Saudi Arabia i came across dozens of Morays and was never harmed by one indeed my mate used to hand feed one in Teneriffe it was amazing to watch. The ferocious posture of Morays whilst located in thier holes is a breathing reflex that appears menacing so please dont give Mr Moray bad press i for one prefer diving with Morays rather than Congers.
             
            george

            --- On Mon, 15/6/09, shdbone@... <shdbone@...> wrote:


            From: shdbone@... <shdbone@...>
            Subject: Re: [Glaucus] Cornish Moray - first this century
            To: Glaucus@...
            Date: Monday, 15 June, 2009, 8:29 PM








            Thanks Doug, mine of information as always! this one is going to be useful in teaching 'rare but UK fish remains v imported foods' (archaeological that is) By the way where can one get the Wheeler et al - cant find it listed anywhere, should I ask Declan?
            Sheila
            SH-D ArchaeoZoology
            http://www.shd- archzoo.co. uk
            All messages virus checked by ZoneAlarm
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: DOUGLAS HERDSON
            To: Cornish Wildlife ; British Marine Wildlife
            Cc: Matt Slatter ; James Wright ; raymond dennis ; Rory Goodall ; Ellie Connolly
            Sent: Monday, June 15, 2009 5:53 PM
            Subject: [Glaucus] Cornish Moray - first this century

            Hi All

            You may be interested to see this report, if you have not already - http://www.dailymai l.co.uk/news/ article-1192763/ First-moray- eel-caught- Britain-pulled- Cornish-coast. html#.

            Unfortunately it is inaccurate - This is actually the tenth Mediterranean Moray Muraena helena to be caught in British and Irish waters; the first was caught on a line at Polperro in Cornwall in 1834. (One was also found off Ostend, Belgium in 1937.) Also its actual weight was 3.8 kg and length 104 cm. They are a North East Atlantic fish being found from Senegal to the English Channel (and also in the Mediterranean) . They are not a sign of global warming, but a warm water eel that is rare at the northern limit of its distribution. If climate change does continue to raise the sea temperatures around our coasts they may become commoner.

            My report comes from Dave Munday of the MFA Fisheries Office in Newlyn who gives the position as ICES area VIIh square 27E4 - approx. 49 20’N 006 30’ W.

            The literature, most notably Wheeler, Merrett and Quigley (2004) gives three previous Cornish records (all in the nineteenth century), one from Ostend, one Herm and one Irish; however I have checked through the records held by the Newlyn fisheries office and
            find that a further three were landed to Newlyn in the 1990s, and Paul Gainey reports one off Land's End in 1989.

            regards, Doug
            Doug Herdson
            Marine Fish Information Services
            94 Dunstone View
            Plymstock
            Plymouth. PL9 8QW
            Email: Douglas.Herdson@ btinternet. com
            Telephone: +44(0)1752 405155

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
















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