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8932Re: V&A HG

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  • clarerosephd
    Dec 11, 2012
      HI All
      I'm a dress historian in my day job - the dress on the 'head' is not particularly low-cut for 1770 (though normally a kerchief would cover the bosom).
      As for male/female users - one of the most popular costumes for women going to masquerades and fancy-dress balls in the C18th was the 'savoyarde' complete with delicate guitar-backed gurdy. Zoffany did a portrait of a woman who lived in Calcutta in this costume - I posted it on the facebook gurdy forum. Bagpipes were always depicted with male players.
      V&A galleries - I have been told by a contact in the V&A that a gurdy w(probably this one) will be included in the new European Dec Arts gallery, opening next year. I also advised them to talk to some players before writing the object labels!

      Clare

      --- In HurdyGurdyForum@..., Jim Alcock <hanibal.lector13@...> wrote:
      >
      > Sorry but I have to disagree with you both!. I was a re-enactor for the
      > American rev war for some time and researched more than most on the subject
      > and much more on the social side than the military. It still is a century
      > that fascinates me. An off shoot of that was being a member of the Bath
      > minuet Soc for several years.
      > The decoration on this instrument is quite restrained for the period and
      > of a high quality and I think is very nice. 18th c. taste was very
      > different from todays and 'over the top' was order of the day. It was a
      > statement of wealth as well. Perhaps you find it ugly because it's a guitar
      > body, which I hate - this is the nicest I've seen.
      > As for ladies instrument - I don't think so. The unusual head carving is
      > actually quite saucy - this buxom lady is hitching up her dress to reveal
      > the instrument emerging from... This is more likely a 'gentleman's
      > conversation' piece, to be admired and fiddled with by said gentleman's
      > male friends, it's size making it more easily concealed from the
      > gentleman's wife. It might also explain the absence of a makers name.
      > Just my tuppence worth, any other suggestions?
      > Jim A.
      >
      > On Tue, Dec 11, 2012 at 10:46 AM, Mike Gilpin <
      > mikegilpin@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > That's the oil hole.
      > >
      > > I've seen this instrument and it's tiny!
      > > Cheers
      > > Mike
      > > www.hurdygurdy.biz
      > >
      > > *From:* Richard York <richard@...>
      > > *Sent:* Tuesday, December 11, 2012 10:35 AM
      > > *To:* HurdyGurdyForum@...
      > > *Subject:* Re: [HurdyGurdyForum] Re: V&A HG
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Agreed.
      > > What's the function of the small bridge with what looks like a golf tee on
      > > it between the proper bridge and the tangent box?
      > >
      > > The real pity is of course that as far as I'm aware all these goodies are
      > > now locked away, since the V&A closed its instrument gallery. I was
      > > fortunate enough to work there a few times when it was still open, and the
      > > acoustic was spectacular for playing, but very hard to speak in!
      > > Best wishes,
      > > Richard
      > >
      > > On 11/12/2012 10:26, richard338293 wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yes, really good photos. I always feel ambivalent about instruments that
      > > look like this. On the one hand I recognise that they are intended to
      > > impact the eye as classic 18th century elegant and beautiful but for me
      > > they are WAY over the top and I actual find such instruments ugly. Plus
      > > they look more like a fashion accessory than a serious musical instrument.
      > > I do like the headstock, I didn't know bosoms were an option, but I wonder
      > > how heavy it makes the instrument and how it affects the balance.
      > >
      > > Presumably this one was a woman's instrument and from the looks of it
      > > perhaps intended for lighter pieces, popular tunes etc. rather than actual
      > > chamber sonatas like those of Baton, Lavigne et al, or not.
      > >
      > > R
      > >
      > > --- In mailto:HurdyGurdyForum%40yahoogroups.co.uk<HurdyGurdyForum%40yahoogroups.co.uk>,
      > > "Scott Marshall" mailto:sklmarshall@ <sklmarshall@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Some great pics here:
      > > http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O58966/hurdy-gurdy-unknown/
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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