Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 
  • Back
  • About Group

  • Join Group
, added in the last 7 days

Group Description



The Leighton Buzzard Freegle group is open to all who want to "recycle" that special something rather than throw it away. Whether it's a chair, a fax machine, piano or an old door, feel free to post it. Or maybe you're looking to acquire something yourself! Nonprofit groups are also welcome to participate too!



One main rule: everything posted must be free. This group is part of The Freegle Network, a nonprofit organization and a movement of people interested in keeping good stuff out of landfills. Check out ilovefreegle for other local groups and info on the movement! E-mail leightonbuzzard_freegle-owner@yahoogroups.com for questions or improvement ideas!



N.B. Leighton Buzzard Freegle does not accept any pet posts.



And have fun and jump right in!



And try our Cafe Group LeBuzCafe to "chat" about local issues, seek help and information or publicise community events.





Keeping things local :



target="_blank" HREF="http://www.iloveleightonbuzzard.com">I Love LB is a group of Local Volunteer People, Business Owners, School Teachers and Residents who are dedicated and committed to the town of Leighton Buzzard, it’s community spirit, growth and prosperity.


The strap line is ‘GO LOCAL FIRST’ and the whole ethos is firstly to inform local people of what is actually available in the area and secondly, to encourage them to ‘GO LOCAL FIRST’


target="_blank" HREF="http://www.letsbuzz.org.uk">LetsBuzz is a forum for local trading where members exchange goods and services using a local currency, the Buzzard.

Group Information

  • 9489
  • Recycling
  • Sep 5, 2005
  • English

Group Settings

  • This is a public group.
  • Attachments are permitted.
  • Members cannot hide email address.
  • Listed in Yahoo Groups directory.
  • Membership does not require approval.
  • Messages from new members require approval.
  • All members can post messages.

Message History