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Rope and rigging thicknesses

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  • Gerry Elvy
    Good Morning to all from Canada I tried emailing this yesterday but received no confirmation of it s receipt so will try agin. If it has gone through sorry to
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 22, 2006
      Good Morning to all from Canada
       
      I tried emailing this yesterday but received no confirmation of it's receipt, so will try agin. If it has gone through sorry to bother you again!
       
      I have a question and would appreciate the help.
       
      I am in the process of making my own rope, (for fun) as I have been able to make a rope walk following the suggestions and plans from a fellow model builder. The problem is that I don't know the scale size of the different ropes that were used on a Thames Barge and have no way of finding out other than you folks over there. I have been able to make the ratlines fairly accurate and they look good but it ends there.
       
      If someone could tell me the size of approx. size of the ropes used on a working barge I can then work out the scale myself if necessary.
       
      Thanks in advance for all the help that has been provided so far.
       
       
      Gerry Elvy
      gelvy@...
      Add FUN to your email - CLICK HERE!
    • Mike Wignall
      Gerry, Your question does not have a simple answer! There are dozens of different sets of standing and running rigging. Some are natural fibre - others
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 23, 2006
        Gerry,

        Your question does not have a simple answer! There are dozens of
        different sets of standing and running rigging. Some are natural
        fibre - others flexible steel wire rope.

        However, on working thro' the following:

        BAGSHAW, Captain Harry, "Re-fit: Unrigging And Rigging Thames
        Spritsail Coasting Barge Scone", privately published, n.d. [2002].
        Harry Bagshaw recounted the work of refitting his barge in 1925 to
        his son Arthur many years later.

        I've extracted the following main items of rigging info from various
        parts of the book:

        1. shroud lanyards - 3in. hemp
        2. ratlines - 1in. hemp
        3. mizzen rigging [unspecified] - 1in. hemp
        4. bowsprit rigging [unspecified]- 1in. hemp
        5. barge boat davit falls - 2in. rope
        6. stanliff - 1.75in. steel wire rope
        7. fall of stanliff tackle - 1.75in. rope
        8. mizzen mast forestay - 1.75in. steel wire rope
        9. mizzen mast runners - 1.75in. steel wire rope
        9. mizzen sail brails - 2in. rope unspecified
        10. running part of mizzen halyards - 1.75in. rope
        11. mizzen sprit signal halyard - 0.75in. rope
        12. mizzen sail peak line - 2in. rope
        13. mizzen sail sheet - 2in. rope
        14. mainsheet & jib sheet - 3in. rope
        15. vang falls & topsail sheet - 2.75in rope
        16. runner falls, foresail & staysail halyards - 2.5in. rope
        17. rolling vang falls & staysail sheet - 2.5in. rope
        18. topsail clewlines - 2in. rope
        19. mizzen brails - 2in. rope
        20. foresail hauldown - 2in. rope
        21. fore tack, topsail tack, jib & staysail halyards - 1.75in.
        22. lanyard for draw bucket - 1.75in. rope
        23. crosstree halyards & downhauls - 1in. hemp rope
        24. standing backstays - 2in. steel wire rope
        25. running backstays - 1.75in steel wire rope
        26. topmast stay - 1.75in. steel wire rope
        27. topmast stay & fore tack tackles - 1.75in. rope
        28. footropes on bowsprit - 2in. hemp rope
        29. barge boat's painter - 3in. bass rope
        30. lead line - 1in. "water-laid" rope [whatever that is/was!]*
        31. "working ropes" stowed on fore hatch cover: 1 x 2in. cotton line
        x 120fm, 1 x 2in. manilla check rope x 30fm., 1 x 9in. tow rope x
        30fm., 2 x 6in. bass ropes x 30fm.
        32. "working ropes" stowed on after hatch cover: 2 x 6in. bass plus 1
        x 3in. manilla x ??? fm., 1 x 2in. mooring wire x 30 fm., 4 x ?in.
        springs x 5 fm.

        Note: where "rope" is unspecified it was probably manilla.

        You really need this book. It's a bible of barge un-rigging and re-
        rigging with dozens of sketches and 184 pp. It's heavy. It is
        distributed by John Beaumont [publisher], The Cottage, Braces Quay,
        Dock Lane, BEAULIEU, Hampshire, SO42 7YJ, UK

        HTH, Regards, Mike

        * BGO - non-stretch/non-shrink qualities - otherwise lead line
        useless!


        <snip>
      • Gerry Elvy
        Mike: You are a wealth of knowledge. I am having so much fun with this project I can t begin to tell you how I feel. This is really a labour of love. By the
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 23, 2006
           Mike:
          You are a wealth of knowledge. I am having so much fun with this project I can't begin to tell you how I feel. This is really a labour of love.
          By the way when last talking with Michael I mentioned that I was looking at preparing a short bio of those who are and have been interested in Thames Barges. How they got interested, why still interested etc. As I do have a fair amount of time on my hands and there have been so many people over here in the small community that I live in that have taken an interest in my hobby that I thought it would be kind of interesting in passing on this type of info. What do you think? Does it have merrit?
          Thanks again. There really has been a large amount of work doing this for me, and it is appreciated.
          Please keep in touch
           
          Sincerely
           
           
           
          Gerry Elvy
          gelvy@...
           
           
           
           
           
          Add FUN to your email - CLICK HERE!
        • Gerry Elvy
          Hi Mike: Something interesting just came up from an old Navy buddy of mine, he mentioned that the Navy manuals for seamship gave the rope sizes from England in
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 23, 2006
             Hi Mike:
            Something interesting just came up from an old Navy buddy of mine, he mentioned that the Navy manuals for seamship gave the rope sizes from England in circumfrence rather than dia. until later in the 1900 so that the measurements you gave me from the book 1922 by Harry Bagshaw could possibly be cir. Do you know if this is the case?
            Interesting eh?
             
             
             
             
            Gerry Elvy
            gelvy@...
            -------Original Message-------
             
             
             
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          • Mike Wignall
            Gerry, Sorry about the delay. Interesting? Yes! I wondered about exactly this question when I was working thro Bagshaw s book. Now you ve popped the
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 17, 2006
              Gerry,

              Sorry about the delay. Interesting? Yes! I wondered about exactly
              this question when I was working thro' Bagshaw's book. Now you've
              popped the embarrassing question! I was in the RN myself but that was
              getting on for 2 decades ago. I cannot remember what the norm was
              then!

              However, even if I could, it still wouldn't help as we're talking
              about bargemen in the 19??'s! I need to contact an "old bargeman" -
              I'll come back to you.

              Mike



              --- In Thames_Barges@..., "Gerry Elvy" <gelvy@a...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hi Mike:
              > Something interesting just came up from an old Navy buddy of mine,
              he
              > mentioned that the Navy manuals for seamship gave the rope sizes
              from
              > England in circumfrence rather than dia. until later in the 1900 so
              that the
              > measurements you gave me from the book 1922 by Harry Bagshaw could
              possibly
              > be cir. Do you know if this is the case?
              > Interesting eh?
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Gerry Elvy
              Hi Mike: Well in working with the measurements you so graciously provided I have come to the conclusion that my buddy was right. Those are cir. rather than
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 17, 2006
                Hi Mike:
                Well in working with the measurements you so graciously provided I have come to the conclusion that my buddy was right. Those are cir. 
                 rather than dia.
                But would really like to know if I and he were right.
                 
                By the way, model is coming along quite well.
                Trying to figure out how to seal the hull so that it won't leak. Have considered using a product called "Tremclad" which is a water proof paint used to prevent rust on steel. Problem arose when  the pins I used to secure each plank, left holes. Hopefully this will do the job.
                 
                By the way haven't heard from Mike Land lately, is he ok?
                 
                Another thing would it be better to corr. with you at you personal address rather than Yahoo groups?
                 
                Thanks for the help.
                 
                Have a great day.
                 
                 
                 
                 
                Gerry Elvy
                gelvy@...
                 
                 
                 
                Add FUN to your email - CLICK HERE!
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