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What do you think is the best micro-sized car?

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  • douglas522497
    OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay, witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to whenever: which
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 13, 2010
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      OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay, witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix, Most Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)
    • Martin
      Hmmmm. Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift? Easy that one. The Peel 50 can be lifted by a usefully placed handle on the rear, so digging it out of a snowdrift
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 13, 2010
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        Hmmmm. Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift? Easy that one. The Peel 50 can be
        lifted by a usefully placed handle on the rear, so digging it out of a
        snowdrift would never be a problem – rather than move the snow from around
        the car, simple move the car from the snow, pick it up and drag it away from
        the snow.



        Not quite sure if you would consider it a Microcar, but the Wartburg Knight
        had to be the easiest car I ever worked on. The front panel could be removed
        using a screwdriver (supplied with the car) and swung to one side, then you
        could walk between the chassis rails and use the wheel brace to undue the
        engine mounts and separate the engine from the gearbox to replace the
        clutch. I did this once at the roadside in 15 minutes flat, using only the
        toolkit supplied with the car, which as I recall also included a sharp
        knife, used to cut ice from around the door seals to gain entry in really
        cold weather – something I never had to do here in the UK, but which was
        obviously a design consideration in it’s native East German environment.
        This car was also probably best value for money, setting me back just £50
        with a years tax and MOT – (The tax was worth about £90!)



        My Quietest car award (again not a microsized, but an oddity non the less)
        goes to the Daf 33 I bought as my first car before I as old enough to drive.
        It was a non runner, so it’s silence was probably not typical of the model!
        I drove it just once to the local car auctions once I had got it running and
        remember it as being fairly quiet and comfortable although the engine revs
        remained at a constant hum.



        The only recognized Microcar I owned was a Ligier Ambra, which was
        comfortable enough over the 12 mile commute to work, although speed bumps
        caused the entire car to leave the ground even at low speeds, and the racket
        from the engine made hard working JCBs seem very civilised. A minor change
        in road surface would cause the CD player to change tracks. The diesel
        engine gave a sort of low budget Vibro-massage which woke you up at the
        start of the day and set you off to sleep at the end. Despite my love hate
        relationship with it (I loved the 80 mpg, but hated almost everything else)
        I would have to say that whilst not the easiest to fix, it was the easiest
        to get home after a breakdown. It weighed as much as a wet tissue. It once
        let me down about 3 miles outside my village and I pushed it home up and
        down hill, only to find once I reached the street lighting that the wire had
        dropped off the fuel shut off solenoid, causing it to close and stop fuel
        reaching the engine. So I suppose it was easy to fix to, just reattach the
        wire and off I went again.





        Regards


        Martin



        "In God we trust. Every one else is a suspect"



        From: aixamandmicrocar@...
        [mailto:aixamandmicrocar@...] On Behalf Of douglas522497
        Sent: 13 December 2010 19:39
        To: aixamandmicrocar@...
        Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] What do you think is the best micro-sized car?





        OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay,
        witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to
        whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all
        about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix,
        Most Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • pharte
        I ve had several of each of the Aixam, microcar and Ligier. First rule is don t touch the diesels, they re bloody awful, noisy, slow & vibrate like hell. from
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 16, 2010
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          I've had several of each of the Aixam, microcar and Ligier.
          First rule is don't touch the diesels, they're bloody awful, noisy, slow & vibrate like hell.
          from 3 to 1 in least liked order is the Aixam,
          Shape is not as nice as the othere although there aren't any real down points.
          2nd is the Ligier, I like it's size & shape, it's quick and reliable, only let down by the price of spares and the worst brakes of the bunch.
          Top of the list must be the microcar, only minus points being the gearbox on the Virgo models, the MC1 type are very nice and feel like a proper car plus don't have the dodgy gearbox.
          They all have their inherent faults but a for a quick overall view there's my two penneth worth.


          --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., "Martin" <martin@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hmmmm. Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift? Easy that one. The Peel 50 can be
          > lifted by a usefully placed handle on the rear, so digging it out of a
          > snowdrift would never be a problem – rather than move the snow from around
          > the car, simple move the car from the snow, pick it up and drag it away from
          > the snow.
          >
          >
          >
          > Not quite sure if you would consider it a Microcar, but the Wartburg Knight
          > had to be the easiest car I ever worked on. The front panel could be removed
          > using a screwdriver (supplied with the car) and swung to one side, then you
          > could walk between the chassis rails and use the wheel brace to undue the
          > engine mounts and separate the engine from the gearbox to replace the
          > clutch. I did this once at the roadside in 15 minutes flat, using only the
          > toolkit supplied with the car, which as I recall also included a sharp
          > knife, used to cut ice from around the door seals to gain entry in really
          > cold weather – something I never had to do here in the UK, but which was
          > obviously a design consideration in it's native East German environment.
          > This car was also probably best value for money, setting me back just £50
          > with a years tax and MOT – (The tax was worth about £90!)
          >
          >
          >
          > My Quietest car award (again not a microsized, but an oddity non the less)
          > goes to the Daf 33 I bought as my first car before I as old enough to drive.
          > It was a non runner, so it's silence was probably not typical of the model!
          > I drove it just once to the local car auctions once I had got it running and
          > remember it as being fairly quiet and comfortable although the engine revs
          > remained at a constant hum.
          >
          >
          >
          > The only recognized Microcar I owned was a Ligier Ambra, which was
          > comfortable enough over the 12 mile commute to work, although speed bumps
          > caused the entire car to leave the ground even at low speeds, and the racket
          > from the engine made hard working JCBs seem very civilised. A minor change
          > in road surface would cause the CD player to change tracks. The diesel
          > engine gave a sort of low budget Vibro-massage which woke you up at the
          > start of the day and set you off to sleep at the end. Despite my love hate
          > relationship with it (I loved the 80 mpg, but hated almost everything else)
          > I would have to say that whilst not the easiest to fix, it was the easiest
          > to get home after a breakdown. It weighed as much as a wet tissue. It once
          > let me down about 3 miles outside my village and I pushed it home up and
          > down hill, only to find once I reached the street lighting that the wire had
          > dropped off the fuel shut off solenoid, causing it to close and stop fuel
          > reaching the engine. So I suppose it was easy to fix to, just reattach the
          > wire and off I went again.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Regards
          >
          >
          > Martin
          >
          >
          >
          > "In God we trust. Every one else is a suspect"
          >
          >
          >
          > From: aixamandmicrocar@...
          > [mailto:aixamandmicrocar@...] On Behalf Of douglas522497
          > Sent: 13 December 2010 19:39
          > To: aixamandmicrocar@...
          > Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] What do you think is the best micro-sized car?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay,
          > witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to
          > whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all
          > about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix,
          > Most Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Jenny Fitzpatrick
          The best one I have had up to now is my Aixam petrol crossline GTR.Its a lot bigger than my old Aixam gold and is also quieter and faster.The only thing to
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 16, 2010
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            The best one I have had up to now is my Aixam petrol crossline GTR.Its a lot bigger than my old Aixam gold and is also quieter and faster.The only thing to go wrong with it in two years is the brake light switch and I use mine every day, You sit higher in the crossline and it feels like a proper car.I change the engine and gearbox oil every 3000 miles plus filter and dont cane it.The gearbox in my gold went but I rebuilt it and to be honest its not that difficult thanks to the info on jjs site so I dont see a problem with the gearbox its just a case of looking after it and making sure the oil is OK.    

            --- On Thu, 16/12/10, pharte <pharte32@...> wrote:


            From: pharte <pharte32@...>
            Subject: Re: [Aixam and Microcar] What do you think is the best micro-sized car?
            To: aixamandmicrocar@...
            Date: Thursday, 16 December, 2010, 8:48


             




            I've had several of each of the Aixam, microcar and Ligier.
            First rule is don't touch the diesels, they're bloody awful, noisy, slow & vibrate like hell.
            from 3 to 1 in least liked order is the Aixam,
            Shape is not as nice as the othere although there aren't any real down points.
            2nd is the Ligier, I like it's size & shape, it's quick and reliable, only let down by the price of spares and the worst brakes of the bunch.
            Top of the list must be the microcar, only minus points being the gearbox on the Virgo models, the MC1 type are very nice and feel like a proper car plus don't have the dodgy gearbox.
            They all have their inherent faults but a for a quick overall view there's my two penneth worth.

            --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., "Martin" <martin@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hmmmm. Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift? Easy that one. The Peel 50 can be
            > lifted by a usefully placed handle on the rear, so digging it out of a
            > snowdrift would never be a problem – rather than move the snow from around
            > the car, simple move the car from the snow, pick it up and drag it away from
            > the snow.
            >
            >
            >
            > Not quite sure if you would consider it a Microcar, but the Wartburg Knight
            > had to be the easiest car I ever worked on. The front panel could be removed
            > using a screwdriver (supplied with the car) and swung to one side, then you
            > could walk between the chassis rails and use the wheel brace to undue the
            > engine mounts and separate the engine from the gearbox to replace the
            > clutch. I did this once at the roadside in 15 minutes flat, using only the
            > toolkit supplied with the car, which as I recall also included a sharp
            > knife, used to cut ice from around the door seals to gain entry in really
            > cold weather – something I never had to do here in the UK, but which was
            > obviously a design consideration in it's native East German environment.
            > This car was also probably best value for money, setting me back just £50
            > with a years tax and MOT – (The tax was worth about £90!)
            >
            >
            >
            > My Quietest car award (again not a microsized, but an oddity non the less)
            > goes to the Daf 33 I bought as my first car before I as old enough to drive.
            > It was a non runner, so it's silence was probably not typical of the model!
            > I drove it just once to the local car auctions once I had got it running and
            > remember it as being fairly quiet and comfortable although the engine revs
            > remained at a constant hum.
            >
            >
            >
            > The only recognized Microcar I owned was a Ligier Ambra, which was
            > comfortable enough over the 12 mile commute to work, although speed bumps
            > caused the entire car to leave the ground even at low speeds, and the racket
            > from the engine made hard working JCBs seem very civilised. A minor change
            > in road surface would cause the CD player to change tracks. The diesel
            > engine gave a sort of low budget Vibro-massage which woke you up at the
            > start of the day and set you off to sleep at the end. Despite my love hate
            > relationship with it (I loved the 80 mpg, but hated almost everything else)
            > I would have to say that whilst not the easiest to fix, it was the easiest
            > to get home after a breakdown. It weighed as much as a wet tissue. It once
            > let me down about 3 miles outside my village and I pushed it home up and
            > down hill, only to find once I reached the street lighting that the wire had
            > dropped off the fuel shut off solenoid, causing it to close and stop fuel
            > reaching the engine. So I suppose it was easy to fix to, just reattach the
            > wire and off I went again.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Regards
            >
            >
            > Martin
            >
            >
            >
            > "In God we trust. Every one else is a suspect"
            >
            >
            >
            > From: aixamandmicrocar@...
            > [mailto:aixamandmicrocar@...] On Behalf Of douglas522497
            > Sent: 13 December 2010 19:39
            > To: aixamandmicrocar@...
            > Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] What do you think is the best micro-sized car?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay,
            > witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to
            > whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all
            > about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix,
            > Most Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >











            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • john stanton
            Hi Douglas! I wrote a book about mini and microcars some years ago and because of my comments on the Meadows Frisky, I got to touch base with the grandson of
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 17, 2010
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              Hi Douglas!

              I wrote a book about mini and microcars some years ago and because of my
              comments on the Meadows Frisky, I got to touch base with the grandson of the man
              who was behind this microcar. I got quite a bit more information about the
              Frisky, and was impressed. Based on what I have experienced while working on my
              present "toy" - a Berkeley 328 SE, I can say that the Frisky Sports has all the
              best numbers and makeup for a good, solid and hassle-free microcar. While both
              cars are pretty to look at, the Frisky's layout is much more straightforward,
              and being that it's engine is in the rear of the car, a snap to work on. As the
              Frisky's drive system seems much more solid, its reliability should be better
              than that of a car that is chain-driven - ala the Berkeley. Any two-stroker can
              be made to run quietly with a proper muffler installed. I rigged a good exhaust
              system in my Berkeley and now it runs (rather purrs) like any car on the road.
              As to comfort, both the Berkeley and the Frisky should outshine most of its
              competition. I have always enjoyed driving my little car and even at 800 pound
              light, it does well on most roads.

              John




              ________________________________
              From: douglas522497 <douglasboston@...>
              To: aixamandmicrocar@...
              Sent: Mon, December 13, 2010 2:39:04 PM
              Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] What do you think is the best micro-sized car?

               
              OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay, witchcraft
              or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to whenever: which
              one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all about the Best
              value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix, Most Comfortable etc.
              (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • john stanton
              Hi Martin! Enjoyed your input! Check out mine. John ________________________________ From: Martin To:
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 17, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Martin!

                Enjoyed your input! Check out mine.

                John




                ________________________________
                From: Martin <martin@...>
                To: aixamandmicrocar@...
                Sent: Mon, December 13, 2010 4:54:28 PM
                Subject: RE: [Aixam and Microcar] What do you think is the best micro-sized car?

                 
                Hmmmm. Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift? Easy that one. The Peel 50 can be
                lifted by a usefully placed handle on the rear, so digging it out of a
                snowdrift would never be a problem – rather than move the snow from around
                the car, simple move the car from the snow, pick it up and drag it away from
                the snow.

                Not quite sure if you would consider it a Microcar, but the Wartburg Knight
                had to be the easiest car I ever worked on. The front panel could be removed
                using a screwdriver (supplied with the car) and swung to one side, then you
                could walk between the chassis rails and use the wheel brace to undue the
                engine mounts and separate the engine from the gearbox to replace the
                clutch. I did this once at the roadside in 15 minutes flat, using only the
                toolkit supplied with the car, which as I recall also included a sharp
                knife, used to cut ice from around the door seals to gain entry in really
                cold weather – something I never had to do here in the UK, but which was
                obviously a design consideration in it’s native East German environment.
                This car was also probably best value for money, setting me back just £50
                with a years tax and MOT – (The tax was worth about £90!)

                My Quietest car award (again not a microsized, but an oddity non the less)
                goes to the Daf 33 I bought as my first car before I as old enough to drive.
                It was a non runner, so it’s silence was probably not typical of the model!
                I drove it just once to the local car auctions once I had got it running and
                remember it as being fairly quiet and comfortable although the engine revs
                remained at a constant hum.

                The only recognized Microcar I owned was a Ligier Ambra, which was
                comfortable enough over the 12 mile commute to work, although speed bumps
                caused the entire car to leave the ground even at low speeds, and the racket
                from the engine made hard working JCBs seem very civilised. A minor change
                in road surface would cause the CD player to change tracks. The diesel
                engine gave a sort of low budget Vibro-massage which woke you up at the
                start of the day and set you off to sleep at the end. Despite my love hate
                relationship with it (I loved the 80 mpg, but hated almost everything else)
                I would have to say that whilst not the easiest to fix, it was the easiest
                to get home after a breakdown. It weighed as much as a wet tissue. It once
                let me down about 3 miles outside my village and I pushed it home up and
                down hill, only to find once I reached the street lighting that the wire had
                dropped off the fuel shut off solenoid, causing it to close and stop fuel
                reaching the engine. So I suppose it was easy to fix to, just reattach the
                wire and off I went again.

                Regards

                Martin

                "In God we trust. Every one else is a suspect"

                From: aixamandmicrocar@...
                [mailto:aixamandmicrocar@...] On Behalf Of douglas522497
                Sent: 13 December 2010 19:39
                To: aixamandmicrocar@...
                Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] What do you think is the best micro-sized car?

                OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay,
                witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to
                whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all
                about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix,
                Most Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • douglas522497
                Thanks lads and lasses for the very interesting replies. By the way I have a cutaway drawing of the Frisky in a book Eagle Annual of the Cutaways - looks
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 19, 2010
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                  Thanks lads and lasses for the very interesting replies. By the way I have a cutaway drawing of the Frisky in a book "Eagle Annual of the Cutaways" - looks like a very good idea and one that would make an excellent micro-car now with modern bike engines and manufacturing methods. Any others out there? keep 'em coming. The Flying Frog is quite reliable these days but it has taken years to beat it into that state (maybe one day I will publish my electronic maintenance log to scare all of you with). Happy and safe motoring to you.

                  --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., "douglas522497" <douglasboston@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay, witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix, Most Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)
                  >
                • sidecar_jon
                  I cant really speak for other makes, but my Aixam is 74,000 miles old, runs as slow as it ever did is quiet easy to work on, but its on its third gear
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 19, 2010
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                    I cant really speak for other makes, but my Aixam is 74,000 miles old, runs as slow as it ever did is quiet easy to work on, but its on its third gear box...everything else, pretty much seems good....
                  • john stanton
                    Hi Douglas! Thanks for your reply. Where can I get a copy of the Eagle Annual? John ________________________________ From: douglas522497
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 27, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Douglas!

                      Thanks for your reply.

                      Where can I get a copy of the Eagle Annual?

                      John




                      ________________________________
                      From: douglas522497 <douglasboston@...>
                      To: aixamandmicrocar@...
                      Sent: Sun, December 19, 2010 12:48:51 PM
                      Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] Re: What do you think is the best micro-sized car?

                       
                      Thanks lads and lasses for the very interesting replies. By the way I have a
                      cutaway drawing of the Frisky in a book "Eagle Annual of the Cutaways" - looks
                      like a very good idea and one that would make an excellent micro-car now with
                      modern bike engines and manufacturing methods. Any others out there? keep 'em
                      coming. The Flying Frog is quite reliable these days but it has taken years to
                      beat it into that state (maybe one day I will publish my electronic maintenance
                      log to scare all of you with). Happy and safe motoring to you.


                      --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., "douglas522497" <douglasboston@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay,
                      >witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to
                      >whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all
                      >about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix, Most
                      >Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)
                      >







                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • douglas522497
                      Hi John - it is actually a book The Eagle Annual Of The Cutaways isbn 978-1-4091-0014-0 Hope you can find it somewhere
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jan 5, 2011
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                        Hi John - it is actually a book "The Eagle Annual Of The Cutaways" isbn 978-1-4091-0014-0 Hope you can find it somewhere

                        --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., john stanton <stant0n21@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Douglas!
                        >
                        > Thanks for your reply.
                        >
                        > Where can I get a copy of the Eagle Annual?
                        >
                        > John
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: douglas522497 <douglasboston@...>
                        > To: aixamandmicrocar@...
                        > Sent: Sun, December 19, 2010 12:48:51 PM
                        > Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] Re: What do you think is the best micro-sized car?
                        >
                        >  
                        > Thanks lads and lasses for the very interesting replies. By the way I have a
                        > cutaway drawing of the Frisky in a book "Eagle Annual of the Cutaways" - looks
                        > like a very good idea and one that would make an excellent micro-car now with
                        > modern bike engines and manufacturing methods. Any others out there? keep 'em
                        > coming. The Flying Frog is quite reliable these days but it has taken years to
                        > beat it into that state (maybe one day I will publish my electronic maintenance
                        > log to scare all of you with). Happy and safe motoring to you.
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., "douglas522497" <douglasboston@>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay,
                        > >witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to
                        > >whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all
                        > >about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix, Most
                        > >Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • john stanton
                        Thanks! ________________________________ From: douglas522497 To: aixamandmicrocar@yahoogroups.co.uk Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jan 8, 2011
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                          Thanks!




                          ________________________________
                          From: douglas522497 <douglasboston@...>
                          To: aixamandmicrocar@...
                          Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 2:24:04 PM
                          Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] Re: What do you think is the best micro-sized car?

                           

                          Hi John - it is actually a book "The Eagle Annual Of The Cutaways" isbn
                          978-1-4091-0014-0 Hope you can find it somewhere

                          --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., john stanton <stant0n21@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Douglas!
                          >
                          > Thanks for your reply.
                          >
                          > Where can I get a copy of the Eagle Annual?
                          >
                          > John
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: douglas522497 <douglasboston@...>
                          > To: aixamandmicrocar@...
                          > Sent: Sun, December 19, 2010 12:48:51 PM
                          > Subject: [Aixam and Microcar] Re: What do you think is the best micro-sized
                          >car?
                          >
                          >  
                          > Thanks lads and lasses for the very interesting replies. By the way I have a
                          > cutaway drawing of the Frisky in a book "Eagle Annual of the Cutaways" - looks

                          > like a very good idea and one that would make an excellent micro-car now with
                          > modern bike engines and manufacturing methods. Any others out there? keep 'em
                          > coming. The Flying Frog is quite reliable these days but it has taken years to

                          > beat it into that state (maybe one day I will publish my electronic maintenance
                          >
                          > log to scare all of you with). Happy and safe motoring to you.
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In aixamandmicrocar@..., "douglas522497" <douglasboston@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > OK come on now - straw poll time. Using personal experience, heresay,
                          > >witchcraft or whatever and using cars from right now all the way back to
                          > >whenever: which one do you consider the best and why? Lets hear from you all
                          > >about the Best value for Money, Most Reliable, Quietest, Easiest to Fix, Most

                          > >Comfortable etc. (Maybe, topically, Easiest to dig out of a snowdrift)
                          > >
                          >
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                          >







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