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Thicknesses

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  • Stephen White
    Dear dinghysolent, I have a hardwood GP14 centreboard that I want to strip, sort out and finish by sheathing in glass and epoxy. At the moment it s 20mm thick
    Message 1 of 12 , 1 Jul
      Dear dinghysolent,

      I have a hardwood GP14 centreboard that I want to strip, sort out and finish by sheathing in glass and epoxy. At the moment it's 20mm thick and I need to take 1mm off each side so that when it's built back up it is 20mm.

      I want it to be properly flat and the machine to do this is a thicknesser. Typically proper timber merchants have them, but proper timber merchants are not abundant in North East Hampshire.

      Who do you know who has a thicknesser wide enough to take a full sized centreboard?

      Thanks,

      Steve.
    • alg
      How wide is it? I have a thicknesses will check the max width it can take. If only taking 1mm a power sander will do that in a few minutes as well if hand
      Message 2 of 12 , 2 Jul
        How wide is it? I have a thicknesses will check the max width it can take.

        If only taking 1mm a power sander will do that in a few minutes as well if hand sanding too hard. 



        Sent from my Samsung device


        -------- Original message --------
        From: "Stephen White steve@... [dinghysolent]" <dinghysolent@...>
        Date: 01/07/2017 22:42 (GMT+00:00)
        To: Dinghy Solent <dinghysolent@...>
        Subject: [dinghysolent] Thicknesses

         

        Dear dinghysolent,

        I have a hardwood GP14 centreboard that I want to strip, sort out and finish by sheathing in glass and epoxy. At the moment it's 20mm thick and I need to take 1mm off each side so that when it's built back up it is 20mm.

        I want it to be properly flat and the machine to do this is a thicknesser. Typically proper timber merchants have them, but proper timber merchants are not abundant in North East Hampshire.

        Who do you know who has a thicknesser wide enough to take a full sized centreboard?

        Thanks,

        Steve.

      • paulh_boats
        Steve 20mm of hardwood should be more than strong enough for a 14ft boat, without any glass cloth. Why do you think it needs glassing? I would be inclined to
        Message 3 of 12 , 2 Jul
          Steve

          20mm of hardwood should be more than strong enough for a 14ft boat, without any glass cloth. Why do you think it needs glassing?

          I would be inclined to use a power sander to clean up, then fill holes and leading edge with thickened epoxy (or any major wear area).

          Then ideally finish with epoxy then 2 pack paint which will set very hard.

          Cheers
          Paul
        • alan.moulton
          Hi Steve, I think Goodwillies Timber in Waterlooville have one. At least they used to. They thickness planed a hardwood centreboard from a Wayfarer for me some
          Message 4 of 12 , 2 Jul
            Hi Steve,

            I think Goodwillies Timber in Waterlooville have one. At least they used to. They thickness planed a hardwood centreboard from a Wayfarer for me some years back on an enormous machine at a very reasonable price.


            Alan

          • sw13644
            I ve been here and done this wrong already. Sometimes a gorilla Crew can rip the handle off a solid wooden centreboard along the grain. So to stop that I
            Message 5 of 12 , 2 Jul
              I've been here and done this wrong already. Sometimes a gorilla Crew can rip the handle off a solid wooden centreboard along the grain. So to stop that I sanded it by hand, glassed it and varnished it with anti UV and it looked beautiful.

              But it was too thick because I'd not hand power sanded the thickness evenly.

              So I want flatness and accuracy, and not waste all the effort I put into the last one.

              I could split it, put it through my thicknesser and epoxy it back together but it seems a waste if I can just send it through a wide enough machine.

              Steve.
            • Algie Bennett
              so how wide is it? Kind Regards, Alg Bennett www.smalltrimaran.co.uk (not much on here yet, just started sorting it) cid:image001.png@01D275A7.1AA8BD20 From:
              Message 6 of 12 , 2 Jul

                so how wide is it?

                 

                Kind Regards,

                 

                Alg Bennett

                www.smalltrimaran.co.uk (not much on here yet, just started sorting it)

                 

                cid:image001.png@01D275A7.1AA8BD20

                 

                From: dinghysolent@... [mailto:dinghysolent@...]
                Sent: 02 July 2017 22:28
                To: dinghysolent@...
                Subject: [dinghysolent] Re:: Thicknesses

                 

                 

                I've been here and done this wrong already. Sometimes a gorilla Crew can rip the handle off a solid wooden centreboard along the grain. So to stop that I sanded it by hand, glassed it and varnished it with anti UV and it looked beautiful.

                But it was too thick because I'd not hand power sanded the thickness evenly.

                So I want flatness and accuracy, and not waste all the effort I put into the last one.

                I could split it, put it through my thicknesser and epoxy it back together but it seems a waste if I can just send it through a wide enough machine.

                Steve.

              • Elizabeth Baker
                The only person I know is Nick Gates, who runs a boat restoration service in Emsworth Marina and is DCA sympathetic. Liz From: Stephen White
                Message 7 of 12 , 3 Jul
                  The only person I know is Nick Gates, who runs a boat restoration service in Emsworth Marina and is DCA sympathetic.
                  Liz


                  From: "Stephen White steve@... [dinghysolent]" <dinghysolent@...>
                  To: Dinghy Solent <dinghysolent@...>
                  Sent: Saturday, 1 July 2017, 22:56
                  Subject: [dinghysolent] Thicknesses

                   
                  Dear dinghysolent,

                  I have a hardwood GP14 centreboard that I want to strip, sort out and finish by sheathing in glass and epoxy. At the moment it's 20mm thick and I need to take 1mm off each side so that when it's built back up it is 20mm.

                  I want it to be properly flat and the machine to do this is a thicknesser. Typically proper timber merchants have them, but proper timber merchants are not abundant in North East Hampshire.

                  Who do you know who has a thicknesser wide enough to take a full sized centreboard?

                  Thanks,

                  Steve.


                • cee.dubs
                  How about a couple of long screws through the base of the handle area and into the meet of the board, (?diagonally-ish) across the grain, to diffuse the
                  Message 8 of 12 , 3 Jul

                    How about a couple of long screws through the base of the handle area and into the 'meet' of the board, (?diagonally-ish) across the grain, to diffuse the gorilla effect?


                    Seems a load easier than hours thicknessing and dressing it up.  I also note the full Anti-UV varnish treatment; sounds gorgeous, but I find myself tempted to ask how do you get that much sunlight to a centreplate?


                    Chris Waite  

                  • paulh_boats
                    As Chris suggested metal reinforcements will help. I thought about the problem a bit more and came up with the idea of drilling a long hole through the angle
                    Message 9 of 12 , 4 Jul
                      As Chris suggested metal reinforcements will help.

                      I thought about the problem a bit more and came up with the idea of drilling a long hole through the angle of the handle (Screwfix sell very long drills). Then slowly fill up with epoxy, possibly drilling a perpendicular air vent hole from the side, which will allow the epoxy to eventually reach the bottom of the hole. Then duct tape the air vent hole.
                      Leave for 15 minutes for the epoxy to soak into the wood, then push in 6mm stainless rod that has had thickened epoxy brush on it. Move the rod around until you think it is firmly embedded in the hole. then leave the board overnight with the rod vertical.

                      The long stainless reinforcement should make the handle much stronger.

                      A more radical approach is cut the handle off at exactly 90 degrees with a chop saw. Drill an 8mm hole in the handle on a pillar drill - you may need to hold it in a vice. Hold the handle in place (or clamp it) and use it as a jig to start drilling a hole in the rudder body. After an inch or two remove the handle and drill down about 4 ins into the bulk of the rudder.
                      Epoxy a long 8mm stainless rod in the handle as a stud, protruding the height of the angle plus 1 inch. Allow to set 24 hours.
                      Counter-bore the handle to the size of an M8 nut - then fill the hole in the handle with epoxy allowing 15 minutes to soak in. Then epoxy the handle on to the stud, tightening up with an 8mm stainless nyloc nut.

                      Hope that helps.
                      -Paul
                    • sail_and_oar
                      To reduce the thickness of a plank or board I usually set a router to the depth required to be removed (1mm in this case) and cut a series of grooves in the
                      Message 10 of 12 , 31 Jul
                        To reduce the thickness of a plank or board I usually set a router to the depth required to be removed (1mm in this case) and cut a series of grooves in the face. I then remove the ridges, usually with a 24 grit masonry disc in an angle grinder and tidy it up with a power sander.

                        You can use a skill saw instead of a router and a plane instead of a grinder. Some hardwoods are very difficult to plane. African mahogany is a delight, sepele not too bad. Meranti and iroko are enough to make a saint swear.

                        It's good to try the router out on a bit of scrap wood first. Set the bit to cut 1mm deep, cut a groove and measure how deep it really is with a vernier caliper (they normally have a depth gauge on the end). With careful adjustment you should be able to get it within a quarter of a millimeter

                        Cliff




                        ---In dinghysolent@..., <steve@...> wrote :

                        I've been here and done this wrong already. Sometimes a gorilla Crew can rip the handle off a solid wooden centreboard along the grain. So to stop that I sanded it by hand, glassed it and varnished it with anti UV and it looked beautiful.

                        But it was too thick because I'd not hand power sanded the thickness evenly.

                        So I want flatness and accuracy, and not waste all the effort I put into the last one.

                        I could split it, put it through my thicknesser and epoxy it back together but it seems a waste if I can just send it through a wide enough machine.

                        Steve.
                      • Stephen White
                        Cliff, Thank you. That is an approach to my situation that I had not considered, I have all the tools required and the solution makes perfect sense. I will get
                        Message 11 of 12 , 31 Jul
                          Cliff,

                          Thank you. That is an approach to my situation that I had not considered, I have all the tools required and the solution makes perfect sense. 

                          I will get an accurate result and quickly. 

                          I truly appreciate your considered reply to my question. 

                          Steve. 

                          On 31 Jul 2017, at 19:48, dreamingdotcom@... [dinghysolent] <dinghysolent@...> wrote:

                           

                          To reduce the thickness of a plank or board I usually set a router to the depth required to be removed (1mm in this case) and cut a series of grooves in the face. I then remove the ridges, usually with a 24 grit masonry disc in an angle grinder and tidy it up with a power sander.


                          You can use a skill saw instead of a router and a plane instead of a grinder. Some hardwoods are very difficult to plane. African mahogany is a delight, sepele not too bad. Meranti and iroko are enough to make a saint swear.

                          It's good to try the router out on a bit of scrap wood first. Set the bit to cut 1mm deep, cut a groove and measure how deep it really is with a vernier caliper (they normally have a depth gauge on the end). With careful adjustment you should be able to get it within a quarter of a millimeter

                          Cliff




                          ---In dinghysolent@..., <steve@...> wrote :

                          I've been here and done this wrong already. Sometimes a gorilla Crew can rip the handle off a solid wooden centreboard along the grain. So to stop that I sanded it by hand, glassed it and varnished it with anti UV and it looked beautiful.

                          But it was too thick because I'd not hand power sanded the thickness evenly.

                          So I want flatness and accuracy, and not waste all the effort I put into the last one.

                          I could split it, put it through my thicknesser and epoxy it back together but it seems a waste if I can just send it through a wide enough machine.

                          Steve.

                        • cee.dubs
                          That really is devilish cunning Cliff I tend to find myself having to make up all sorts of ways of bodging the impossible practicalities of (maritime) daily
                          Message 12 of 12 , 1 Aug

                            That really is devilish cunning Cliff


                            I tend to find myself having to make up all sorts of ways of bodging the impossible practicalities of (maritime) daily life, but I hadn't thought of that one


                            Small, medium and tremendous!


                            CW

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