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Re: [Hard of Hearing UK] Comedy and hearing loss

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  • Mazza
    Hi Saff, Well actually I was thinking this when the discussion on comedians from the 70s (or whenever) was going on. Subtitles werent about then and following
    Message 1 of 6 , 1 Apr 02:03
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      Hi Saff,

      Well actually I was thinking this when the discussion on comedians from the 70s (or whenever) was going on. Subtitles werent about then and following a comedians routine was very difficult for me. Some of them spoke slower though, like Frankie Howard and of course there was body language as in Tommy Cooper just looking into the audience and making them laugh!
      Same went for cartoons. I hated them as a child because of course you cant lip read them in any way. But I loved the silent movies with Charlie Chaplin and Tom and Jerry cartoons, and other movies and cartoons that didnt rely on speech. I also loved the circus as a child because a lot of those acts are based on miming and its just a visual thing. As for jokes, I nearly always missed the punch line and if the joke is repeated for you, then it is embarassing everyone watching you to see if you got the joke that time! At school I had some good friends that would explain punch lines to me. They seem to know instintly if I missed it (must have been my false laughter lol).

      Nowadays I find it easy to follow a comedians routine. Thank heavens for subtitles, because the likes of Graham Norton, Victoria Wood and Ben Elton and others speak at the speed of lightning. Without subtitles they just sound a load of mumbo jumbo. I quiet often watch TV with the sound off with the subtitles on and some nice background music :) Also subtitle make following the "Soaps" so much easier. I would never ever watch "Soaps" pre subtitle days and now watch them too much lol.

      Mazza
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    • hippychickjake@aol.com
      I have trouble following some TV programmes especially comedy as you can t always follow subtitles and watch facial expressions at the same time. Also
      Message 2 of 6 , 1 Apr 02:30
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        I have trouble following some TV programmes especially comedy as you can't
        always follow subtitles and watch facial expressions at the same time.

        Also subtitles miss out some of the words being spoken which is confusing.

        While I still have hearing in one ear, although fluctuating with the
        Meniere's I wonder how I will manage when it totally goes. I also hate the
        amount of sweeping camera shots as my vertigo really kickes off.

        Jackie
      • imantunes
        Hi Jackie, You said: I also hate the amount of sweeping camera shots as my vertigo really kickes off I really sympathise with you, as this is something that
        Message 3 of 6 , 1 Apr 03:00
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          Hi Jackie,

          You said: "I also hate the amount of sweeping camera shots as my
          vertigo really kickes off"

          I really sympathise with you, as this is something that I also hate.
          Not only does it make me more dizzy, but I just can't make sense of
          the pictures sometimes and it just seems to confuse the brain. Even
          my husband, who doesn't have ear or vertigo problems, finds that this
          new trendy way of filming makes him dizzy. We both really dislike it.
          I first noticed this "new" style of filming in the American soap ER.
          I hope this style of filming will go out of fashion soon!

          Does anyone get annoyed and or dizzy with sweeping camera shots in
          live programs, soaps, etc? Perhaps we should all complain and they
          might gradually phase them out?

          Saffron
        • elaine hughes
          Hi Saff, In answer to your questions: I find comedy on telly OK if I can concentrate.This doesn t always work as you can guarantee that my daughter will talk
          Message 4 of 6 , 1 Apr 03:03
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            Hi Saff,

            In answer to your questions:
            I find comedy on telly OK if I can concentrate.This doesn't always work as
            you can guarantee that my daughter will talk just as they get to the crux of
            the story and i can't get the subs to work in time!
            I struggle with the radio but usually use it to listen to music anyway.I
            have to concentrate on the chit chat really hard especially if I'm driving
            or it gets lost against the traffic noise.
            The hardest situation for me is social situations when people talk fast or
            at the same time as one another.It is so hard when one person talks in a
            voice I can hear easily then another person talks and drops their voice.I
            just admit defeat in those situations as it's not worth the grief.One of the
            parents at my son's football has a low voice but insists on dropping it when
            we chat as if he's afraid someone is listening in.It's such a struggle and I
            have to ask him to speak up.
            I don't think the problems are particular to the type of loss,more to the
            fact that we all have a loss in the first place and to the loss of natural
            accoustics from our ear moulds.

            Elaine






            >From: imantunes <no_reply@...>
            >Reply-To: hardofhearinguk@...
            >To: hardofhearinguk@...
            >Subject: [Hard of Hearing UK] Comedy and hearing loss
            >Date: Tue, 01 Apr 2003 07:41:14 -0000
            >
            >Talking of comedians, I thought I would ask the members some
            >questions on this, relating to hearing loss:
            >
            >- Do you find that when you listen to comedy on TV, even with
            >subtitles, you have difficulty following? Personally, I find comedy
            >very fast, and of course, some puns or jokes take a few seconds to
            >decipher and then I've missed the next line. I find, with some
            >comedians, whilst I should be relaxing and laughing, I end up getting
            >stressed trying to follow... this is more and more true as my hearing
            >gets worse and I rely more on subtitles and less on hearing.
            >
            >- Can you follow comedy on radio at all? (I can't)
            >
            >- Do you find that live comedy shows (on TV) are sometimes just
            >impossible to follow (too fast to decipher speech, subtitles lag a
            >bit behind, etc)? Personally, I can rarely follow live comedy shows,
            >which is a pity, because I love comedy.
            >
            >- Do you find, that when out with friends, you dread a situation
            >where they all start joking and telling jokes and laughing loud? I
            >do, even though I used to be a real clown and often started jokes
            >myself. However, when friends start tellings jokes, or being silly
            >and laughing, they speak too fast, sometimes several at the same time
            >and then the laughter often covers the punch line. I now consciously
            >or semi-subconsciously avoid these situations, which I must admit, is
            >something that makes me very sad. This is one situation where I find
            >I can't tell my friends to look at me when speaking, or to speak a
            >bit slower... it would take the natural aspect of the situation and
            >spoil the jokes. When friends are nice and understanding enough to
            >repeat a joke for me, it's not as funny as it would have been, if I
            >had heard the first time.
            >
            >I would love to hear about your experiences, as this is one of the
            >things about being severely deaf, that I am still to adapt to and
            >accept and I think sharing experiences always helps.
            >
            >Take care,
            >
            >Saffron
            >
            >PS: Come on members who don't normally post, please, join in! Thanks!
            >


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          • elaine hughes
            HI Jackie, Yes I hate those sweeping camera shots too.My heart sank when they changed the format of Brookside to widescreen and sweeping.It all seems so unreal
            Message 5 of 6 , 1 Apr 03:45
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              HI Jackie,

              Yes I hate those sweeping camera shots too.My heart sank when they changed
              the format of Brookside to widescreen and sweeping.It all seems so unreal
              now.Thank heaven they don't film Doctors like that,eh?

              Elaine






              >From: hippychickjake@...
              >Reply-To: hardofhearinguk@...
              >To: hardofhearinguk@...
              >Subject: Re: [Hard of Hearing UK] Comedy and hearing loss
              >Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2003 05:30:14 EST
              >
              >I have trouble following some TV programmes especially comedy as you can't
              >always follow subtitles and watch facial expressions at the same time.
              >
              >Also subtitles miss out some of the words being spoken which is confusing.
              >
              >While I still have hearing in one ear, although fluctuating with the
              >Meniere's I wonder how I will manage when it totally goes. I also hate the
              >amount of sweeping camera shots as my vertigo really kickes off.
              >
              >Jackie


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            • Tony Roulinson
              Well, yes, hearing people have difficulty with some of the fast talk comedians as well I hear. But try listening to Jackie Mason on the radio. A brilliant and
              Message 6 of 6 , 1 Apr 08:07
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                Well, yes, hearing people have difficulty with some of the fast talk
                comedians as well I hear. But try listening to Jackie Mason on the radio.
                A brilliant and intellectual, ex Rabbi, comedian. But I can't catch a
                bloody word! As usual a strong American brawl of an accent is the problem
                here.

                Tony

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "imantunes" <no_reply@...>
                To: <hardofhearinguk@...>
                Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 8:41 AM
                Subject: [Hard of Hearing UK] Comedy and hearing loss


                > Talking of comedians, I thought I would ask the members some
                > questions on this, relating to hearing loss:
                >
                > - Do you find that when you listen to comedy on TV, even with
                > subtitles, you have difficulty following? Personally, I find comedy
                > very fast, and of course, some puns or jokes take a few seconds to
                > decipher and then I've missed the next line. I find, with some
                > comedians, whilst I should be relaxing and laughing, I end up getting
                > stressed trying to follow... this is more and more true as my hearing
                > gets worse and I rely more on subtitles and less on hearing.
                >
                > - Can you follow comedy on radio at all? (I can't)
                >
                > - Do you find that live comedy shows (on TV) are sometimes just
                > impossible to follow (too fast to decipher speech, subtitles lag a
                > bit behind, etc)? Personally, I can rarely follow live comedy shows,
                > which is a pity, because I love comedy.
                >
                > - Do you find, that when out with friends, you dread a situation
                > where they all start joking and telling jokes and laughing loud? I
                > do, even though I used to be a real clown and often started jokes
                > myself. However, when friends start tellings jokes, or being silly
                > and laughing, they speak too fast, sometimes several at the same time
                > and then the laughter often covers the punch line. I now consciously
                > or semi-subconsciously avoid these situations, which I must admit, is
                > something that makes me very sad. This is one situation where I find
                > I can't tell my friends to look at me when speaking, or to speak a
                > bit slower... it would take the natural aspect of the situation and
                > spoil the jokes. When friends are nice and understanding enough to
                > repeat a joke for me, it's not as funny as it would have been, if I
                > had heard the first time.
                >
                > I would love to hear about your experiences, as this is one of the
                > things about being severely deaf, that I am still to adapt to and
                > accept and I think sharing experiences always helps.
                >
                > Take care,
                >
                > Saffron
                >
                > PS: Come on members who don't normally post, please, join in! Thanks!
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > hardofhearinguk-unsubscribe@...
                >
                >
                >
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                >
                >
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