Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

books v programmes

Expand Messages
  • joyteach1
    Good points, Gem. No, I ve not read any of the books. I get the idea from those who have read them that the characters are very different from their TV
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 22, 2004
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Good points, Gem.

      No, I've not read any of the books.

      I get the idea from those who have read them that the characters are
      very different from their TV counterparts. So,I'm treating them in my
      mind as original characters in a TV series and their adventures as
      being made up by scriptwriters. If and when I read the books I'll try
      to see them simply as books which happen to have characters with
      similar names to some I've come across elsewhere. That way I won't be
      disappointed.

      I've heard P.D. James, Colin Dexter and Ruth Rendell say that while
      they were writing books after their earlier works had been adapted
      for TV, they imagined their policemen looking and sounding like the
      actors. They also tended then to consider how a scene and a storyline
      would pan out on TV. My guess would be that doing that would make it
      more likely that the TV story stuck more closely to the book.


      I gather Elizabeth George is an American authoress who writes about
      the British police. I can imagine that the everyday lives of the
      heroes and villains, which TV viewers want to see,would be difficult
      for an American writer to develop in the detail that would appear on
      a British TV screen.So,the scriptwriters for the TV series need a
      fairly free range.


      I felt that the adoption scam last week had a somewhat American
      flavour to it. I wonder whether the story came from a book ?

      I've learnt to be cautious about credits such as 'based on the
      characters created by x' or 'from the books by x' rather
      than 'adapted by x from her novel y'. Not only are the characters
      likely to be different, the outcome of the story could be different
      too.

      There is a yahoo ! group for readers of the Inspector Lynley books,
      by the way. I came across it when I was trying to find out whether
      there was one for the TV series.

      Something I like about the series is the way in which they show often
      show Havers as the sergeant doing her own work, and not just as a
      side-kick to an inspector. That seems more realistic to me.This
      week's episode,according to the Radio Times looks as though it's
      going to be more Barbara and Helen based, so it should be
      interesting. I like to see professional women working.

      Joyce
    • Gem
      Hmm.. Yes - maybe treating the tv series and the books as two completely separate entities would be the best plan. You said you thought the last episode had a
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 22, 2004
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Hmm.. Yes - maybe treating the tv series and the books as two
        completely separate entities would be the best plan.
        You said you thought the last episode had a kind of 'American
        flavour' to it, but I'm not sure it was based on a book by Elizabeth
        George. All the previous eps based on her books carried the title of
        the book as the title of the episode, but there is no book called 'A
        Cry for Justice' (I've been geeky and searched for it on the web), so
        I guess it was written by the BBC.
        I wonder what the author herself thinks of this - I'm not sure I'd
        like someone making up new stories for my characters! Mind you, I'm
        so glad she's letting them do it, otherwise the whole series would
        have ended the week before last!

        I think as she's an American author, it would definitely be
        interesting to see whether her take on the British Police force is
        different to my perceptions - might go root around in the library and
        check some of her books out....

        I agree with what you said about it being nice to see Havers working
        on her own, rather than just as a 'side-kick', but I really want to
        know more about her background - is there more about her in the
        previous series? Why is she so defensive all the time?
        She and Lynley seem to get on alright at the mo, but I gather there
        were feathers ruffled in the first series, as their personalities
        clashed! Certainly makes for interesting viewing!
        I'm glad it didn't resolve in the conventional way (i.e. into
        romance), because when that happens, the series usually gets into
        trouble - i.e. where to go from there, because the whole 'will-they-
        won't-they thing keeps people coming back for more.

        Oops, this is a bit of a monster post - think I'll leave it here for
        now!

        Gem
      • joyteach1
        ... Elizabeth ... You are right, Gem. I ve just looked in last week s Radio Times. It says that they have run out of books so they are now using original
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 23, 2004
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In inspectorlynley@..., "Gem"
          <blue_sugar_mice@y...> wrote:
          > Hmm.. Yes - maybe treating the tv series and the books as two
          > completely separate entities would be the best plan.
          > You said you thought the last episode had a kind of 'American
          > flavour' to it, but I'm not sure it was based on a book by
          Elizabeth
          > George.

          You are right, Gem. I've just looked in last week's Radio Times. It
          says that they have run out of books so they are now using original
          writers. I just thought that an adoption scam like that would be too
          difficult to perpetuate in this country, especially over so many
          years and in the same city.

          Some of our TV series nowadays seem angled at an American audience.
          They are thinking about sales I suppose. And good luck to them.


          >All the previous eps based on her books carried the title of
          > the book as the title of the episode, but there is no book
          called 'A
          > Cry for Justice' (I've been geeky and searched for it on the web),
          so
          > I guess it was written by the BBC.

          Yes. The writer was Ann-Marie Di Mambo.

          > I wonder what the author herself thinks of this - I'm not sure I'd
          > like someone making up new stories for my characters! Mind you, I'm
          > so glad she's letting them do it, otherwise the whole series would
          > have ended the week before last!

          I wonder whether she is letting them do it or whether they are just
          doing it anyway. When they made Cordelia Grey into a single mother,
          PD James was so upset she stopped writing the books. I hope Elizabeth
          George doesn't feel the same. Have you come across any interviews
          with her on that subject while you've been surfing ?

          > I think as she's an American author, it would definitely be
          > interesting to see whether her take on the British Police force is
          > different to my perceptions - might go root around in the library
          and
          > check some of her books out....
          >

          Good idea

          > I agree with what you said about it being nice to see Havers
          working
          > on her own, rather than just as a 'side-kick', but I really want to
          > know more about her background - is there more about her in the
          > previous series?

          Yes. Her brother died and it devastated her parents. She was having
          to care for them and work on her cases at the same time. Her mother
          developed Alzheimer's or something like it. I can't remember whether
          her father was ill too but I seem to remember he died at some
          point.

          > Why is she so defensive all the time?

          She was in quite a turmoil with her responsibilities, burning the
          candle at both ends, when they paired her up on a case with Lynley.
          She thought the Met was looking for a chance to get rid of her. They
          wanted her to annoy somebody high up.

          Lynley was in a glum mood at the time because the woman he was in
          love with had got married. Lynley was best man. His friend, the
          groom, didn't know about his feelings.

          So, it began with them both having things to be touchy about.

          > She and Lynley seem to get on alright at the mo, but I gather there
          > were feathers ruffled in the first series, as their personalities
          > clashed! Certainly makes for interesting viewing!

          The Radio Times says that Nathaniel Parker says, 'Elizabeth George
          created the tensions between my character and Sharon Small's. They
          had their class differences,as well as the conflicts between a man
          and a woman.We've more or less dropped the class distinctions between
          them now.'

          > I'm glad it didn't resolve in the conventional way (i.e. into
          > romance), because when that happens, the series usually gets into
          > trouble - i.e. where to go from there, because the whole 'will-they-
          > won't-they thing keeps people coming back for more.

          I agree. A romance between those two wouldn't do at all. In fact it
          was Barbara who spotted the potential for a relationship with Helen.
          She didn't exactly go as far as match-making but she gave him a go-
          for-it push.


          > Oops, this is a bit of a monster post - think I'll leave it here
          for
          > now!
          >
          > Gem

          Well, it's even bigger now.

          Joyce
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.