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352Re: In praise of Perikles

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  • Founder.
    Dec 14, 2007
      Oh, and I forgot to mention that it runs at 2-3 hours. A perfect
      medium-length for our club. It has a finite ending. It runs for 3
      turns or wars, and then you count up VP's, rather than conquer-a-
      whole-map. And it's cleverly slightly less prone to Tall Poppy
      Syndrome than most multi-player military games are. The rules are
      fairly simple, the depth and possible strategies large and not
      obvious.

      Another huge plus for it is that there is virtually no boring down-
      time while the other players take their turns. You are always
      intimately affected by what each player does on his turn, so you stay
      interested, actively suggesting he might do X rather than Y, in
      return for which ...

      It worked brilliantly with 4 players; it would be interesting to try
      it with 5 players.

      Bob


      --- In lbgc@..., "Founder." <bobroscow@...> wrote:
      >
      > Neil picked up a copy of Perikles for £9.99 from TKMaxx, yep that
      > clothing store with branches in Uxbridge, Ealing, Hammersmith (King
      > Street) etc. Yep, £9.99 for a typically £39.99 game! Mind you, my
      > Ealing branch has been out-of-stock of it for 3 visits - no wonder!
      >
      > So we tried it out on 2 Dec. Great. It then got the rare accolade
      > of being played two-sessions-in-a-row, on 9 Dec, and played
      > excellently again, IMHO.
      >
      > We love the game! (see the poll). It is designed by a Martin
      > Wallace, a Brit in the north - who apparently designed another
      club
      > favourite, Railroad Tycoon. Hey we must try his others. George is
      > going to bring one called Liberte.
      >
      > Perikles is, IMHO, a brilliant mix of politics, diplomacy and
      > warfare, with very neat interaction and trade-off between the three.
      >
      > Everywhere I looked, there was an innovative (to me, at least)
      > mechanism which worked superbly - the asymmetric cities, rather
      than
      > all similar; the nominating tiles (get in early or wait till
      late?);
      > the dagger tiles (which is what makes the nomination tiles a
      balanced
      > choice); the alpha and beta; the fact that clever nominations can
      > exclude the most powerful from being a candidate, and yet leave him
      > strong influence for next turn; use and exploit a city, it will
      > probably be someone else's next turn; statues, such that, later,
      > there are some cities you WOULD like to inflict a defeat on, and
      some
      > you wouldn't; the VP balance between battles, statues and influence
      > left at the end (perfect); the filling-in of nominations, always a
      > case of who has higher priorities where; the option to trade future
      > influence for troops now (if you have a city with troops to spare);
      > the brilliant combat mechanism, with few modifiers to remember, and
      > yet tactically challenging; the two rounds for a battle, with the
      > first giving you a head-start on the second; the race to become
      > primary attacker (or defender), so that you stand to win or lose
      the
      > VP's at stake when battle is resolved.
      >
      > Plus the tension of defending ALL your battles, or
      inviting/accepting
      > others in to be prime defender, and/or negotiating others in to be
      > allies for no direct gain, but indirect, or a diplomatic quid pro
      > quo; the effect of battle-arrangements on the influence you leave
      > yourself next turn; the effect of battle-outcomes on the value of
      > statues; and on the military strength of a city for next turn; and
      > the limit to 10 cards showing to pick from, such that you can't do
      > whatever you want in any city, you have to choose the best
      > available ... with half an eye on what that would leave the next
      > guys, eg something with a dagger or nomination on it ... but that's
      > in a city I'm not trying to wrest control of ... I could go on ...
      >
      > It's a great game, a great mix of politics, diplomacy, resources
      and
      > battles, without too much in the way of modifiers, accountancy or
      > arcane rules.
      >
      > I recommend it. And this gives me an idea ... see a later post if
      I
      > don't get interrupted.
      >
      > Bob
      >
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