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First use of word "lido" in London

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  • ach39310
    I have checked the situation in London. The first open air swimming pool that I can find that was officially called a lido was The Edmonton Lido in
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 11, 2005
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      I have checked the situation in London. The first open air swimming
      pool that I can find that was officially called a lido was "The
      Edmonton Lido" in Houndsfield Road, following reopening after
      refurbishment on 27 July 1935.

      The newly built "Tottenham Lido", opened on 05 June 1937 and
      the "West Ham Municipal Lido", opened on 30 Aug 1937 were officially
      called lidos from the outset.

      Elsewhere, the Woodford Times reported on 13 May 1932 on the
      new "Lido" being costructed at Whipps Cross. The Kentish Times on 09
      June 1933 similarly carried the headline, "Lagoon 'Lido' Opened on
      Bank Holiday". Neither of these two pools was officially called
      a "lido" at this time, however.

      Interestingly, the term "lido" was also applied to several private
      sector swimming facilities, including Ruislip Lido (part of a
      resevoir), opened in May 1936 and Rush Green Lido in Romford (old
      gravel pits)in Sept 1935.

      Finally, I love the quote in LCC minutes from 1937, following the
      approval of the construction of Parliament Hill Lido, from a "Miss
      Fulford". She expressed regret that the Parks Committee was unable
      to find a really good english alternative to "lido", which, being
      foreign, was not altogether appropriate!

      Andy
    • Mary Cane
      Oh dear, another addict of LCC minutes! But it is the Metropolitan Board of Works that I love. I decided I had better stop for while when I found myself
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 11, 2005
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        Oh dear, another addict of LCC minutes! But it is the Metropolitan Board
        of Works that I love. I decided I had better stop for while when I found
        myself feeling thrilled by the recording of the purchase of oars for the
        boatman who was employed to fish people in difficulties out of the then
        only officially sanctioned swimming place on Hampstead Heath, what is
        now known as the Hampstead Mixed Pond. I would excitedly tell people
        what I had found... and watch their eyes glaze over.

        The Perilous Pond became the Peerless Pool after it was privatised - I
        wish it was still there now, near Old Street. No glamorous Lido it had a
        library and another pool for fishing. It was probably the first open air
        pool that anyone paid to swim in.


        Mary



        -----Original Message-----
        From: lidos@... [mailto:lidos@...] On Behalf
        Of ach39310
        Sent: 11 June 2005 10:17
        To: lidos@...
        Subject: [lidos] First use of word "lido" in London

        I have checked the situation in London. The first open air swimming
        pool that I can find that was officially called a lido was "The
        Edmonton Lido" in Houndsfield Road, following reopening after
        refurbishment on 27 July 1935.

        The newly built "Tottenham Lido", opened on 05 June 1937 and
        the "West Ham Municipal Lido", opened on 30 Aug 1937 were officially
        called lidos from the outset.

        Elsewhere, the Woodford Times reported on 13 May 1932 on the
        new "Lido" being costructed at Whipps Cross. The Kentish Times on 09
        June 1933 similarly carried the headline, "Lagoon 'Lido' Opened on
        Bank Holiday". Neither of these two pools was officially called
        a "lido" at this time, however.

        Interestingly, the term "lido" was also applied to several private
        sector swimming facilities, including Ruislip Lido (part of a
        resevoir), opened in May 1936 and Rush Green Lido in Romford (old
        gravel pits)in Sept 1935.

        Finally, I love the quote in LCC minutes from 1937, following the
        approval of the construction of Parliament Hill Lido, from a "Miss
        Fulford". She expressed regret that the Parks Committee was unable
        to find a really good english alternative to "lido", which, being
        foreign, was not altogether appropriate!

        Andy









        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Oliver Merrington
        Looking for the earliest use of the word Lido for a swimming location in the UK I found: Highfields Lido (a massive 330 ft by 75 ft) in Nottingham, see
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 15, 2005
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          Looking for the earliest use of the word Lido for a swimming location in the UK I found:
           
          Highfields Lido (a massive 330 ft by 75 ft) in Nottingham, see
           
           
          - an article in Lenton Listener dating from 1982 - which says:
           
          "The Lido first opened in August 1924 and local papers for the 15th August announced that it was now open to swimmers who care to take their own costumes and towels."
           
          It's not clear from the article whether the word Lido was used from the opening date. Do you know, Ian?
           
          So, is this the earliest?
           
          Oliver
           
          PS The word 'lido', as used in Italy, is derived from the Latin litus meaning a shore, or bank.
        • Mary Cane
          Thank you for the pictures of Highfields Lido. I used to swim there in my wild youth in the early 1960s. What a treat. Now it is covered by an art gallery and
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 15, 2005
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            Thank you for the pictures of Highfields Lido. I used to swim there in my wild youth in the early 1960s. What a treat. Now it is covered by an art gallery and café… a great loss.

             

            Mary Cane

             

            ·          

          • Dan Lucas
            Highfields Lido Yes - it was a derelict shell when I came to Nottm in 1988 but it was only a matter of time before the City Council sold it to the University
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 15, 2005
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              Highfields Lido
               
              Yes - it was a derelict shell when I came to Nottm in 1988 but it was only a matter of time before the City Council sold it to the University who built the art gallery mentioned (I was a student at the time and at that point the University had no swimming pool and during the summer months we undergrads missed the chance to swim - until a fellow student 'found' the Bulwell Lido in the far flung suburb of Bulwell conveniently close to the terminus of the number 35 bus route that served our hall of residence!)
               
              The old lido building would have made an excellent art gallery (as it was all walled in) but that would have been too imaginative for the architects concerned so we have a very run of the mill art gallery and music school with the inevitable cafe + pond and fountain (oh, and car park).
               
              Dan Lucas
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Mary Cane
              Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2005 6:57 PM
              Subject: RE: [lidos] First use of word "lido" to describe an outdoor pool in the UK

              Thank you for the pictures of Highfields Lido. I used to swim there in my wild youth in the early 1960s. What a treat. Now it is covered by an art gallery and café… a great loss.

               

              Mary Cane

               

              ·          







            • Janet Smith
              May I also highly recommend the Municipal Journal and Public Works Engineer - an absolutely riveting read. Janet ... From: Mary Cane
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 17, 2005
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                May I also highly recommend the Municipal Journal and Public Works
                Engineer - an absolutely riveting read.
                Janet
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Mary Cane" <mcane@...>
                To: <lidos@...>
                Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2005 7:44 PM
                Subject: RE: [lidos] First use of word "lido" in London


                > Oh dear, another addict of LCC minutes! But it is the Metropolitan Board
                > of Works that I love. I decided I had better stop for while when I found
                > myself feeling thrilled by the recording of the purchase of oars for the
                > boatman who was employed to fish people in difficulties out of the then
                > only officially sanctioned swimming place on Hampstead Heath, what is
                > now known as the Hampstead Mixed Pond. I would excitedly tell people
                > what I had found... and watch their eyes glaze over.
                >
                > The Perilous Pond became the Peerless Pool after it was privatised - I
                > wish it was still there now, near Old Street. No glamorous Lido it had a
                > library and another pool for fishing. It was probably the first open air
                > pool that anyone paid to swim in.
                >
                >
                > Mary
                >
                >
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: lidos@... [mailto:lidos@...] On Behalf
                > Of ach39310
                > Sent: 11 June 2005 10:17
                > To: lidos@...
                > Subject: [lidos] First use of word "lido" in London
                >
                > I have checked the situation in London. The first open air swimming
                > pool that I can find that was officially called a lido was "The
                > Edmonton Lido" in Houndsfield Road, following reopening after
                > refurbishment on 27 July 1935.
                >
                > The newly built "Tottenham Lido", opened on 05 June 1937 and
                > the "West Ham Municipal Lido", opened on 30 Aug 1937 were officially
                > called lidos from the outset.
                >
                > Elsewhere, the Woodford Times reported on 13 May 1932 on the
                > new "Lido" being costructed at Whipps Cross. The Kentish Times on 09
                > June 1933 similarly carried the headline, "Lagoon 'Lido' Opened on
                > Bank Holiday". Neither of these two pools was officially called
                > a "lido" at this time, however.
                >
                > Interestingly, the term "lido" was also applied to several private
                > sector swimming facilities, including Ruislip Lido (part of a
                > resevoir), opened in May 1936 and Rush Green Lido in Romford (old
                > gravel pits)in Sept 1935.
                >
                > Finally, I love the quote in LCC minutes from 1937, following the
                > approval of the construction of Parliament Hill Lido, from a "Miss
                > Fulford". She expressed regret that the Parks Committee was unable
                > to find a really good english alternative to "lido", which, being
                > foreign, was not altogether appropriate!
                >
                > Andy
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > No virus found in this incoming message.
                > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
                > Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.6.7 - Release Date: 6/10/05
                >
                >
              • Oliver Merrington
                The original enquirer, Jonathan Hollow, has looked up lido in the Oxford English Dictionary. It traces the first use of the word Lido to describe something
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 18, 2005
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                  The original enquirer, Jonathan Hollow, has looked up "lido" in the Oxford English Dictionary.
                   
                  "It traces the first use of the word Lido to describe something outside the island in the Venetian Lagoon to 1930, but the usage is in inverted commas:

                  1930: Morning Post, 16 July:
                  "The question of the safety of bathers in the Serpentine 'Lido' was raised at an inquest ... yesterday."

                  The inverted commas certainly implies the usage is novel.
                  The next reference removes the inverted commas, but is still rather tentative:

                  1931: Daily Express, 16 October:
                  "£60,000 Lido for England."
                   
                  [For this reference, see Janet's comment in http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/lidos/message/738]
                   
                  So, in conclusion, we might conclude that the Serpentine Lido started the trend as a "beach" resort for swimming in London.
                  (Its archives are in the National Archives, Kew - anyone want to go and look?)
                   
                  Oliver
                   
                  PS I have asked about Ruislip Lido - the earliest reference seems to be around 1933 by the Grand Union Canal Company.
                   
                   

                     
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