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New owner.

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  • g2rywjymyuxj4ldb4cqgt4agkbmsexonybeqvszq
    Seasons greetings one and all! I m delighted to say that I have now bought a Privateer. This is the one that used to belong to Sean Norris. A bermudan rigged
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 26, 2016

      Seasons greetings one and all!

      I'm delighted to say that I have now bought a Privateer. 

      This is the one that used to belong to Sean Norris. A bermudan rigged version. The plate in the stern locker is from Midland Mouldings Ltd., Nottingham. This has the numbers 035  79. Would this indicate moulding 35 of 1979? The Small Craft, Blockley plate in the cockpit has a small stainless plate under it with the number 9541. I'm not able to guess what that number is.

      A couple of questions to be going on with :-

      The boat only has a small folding grapnel type anchor. I'll need something better, is there one that fits comfortably in the moulded depression in the foredeck? 

      Right in the bows is a void space accessible through a small hatch at the end of the vee berths. Can this be utilised as a chain locker? (If I fit a spurling pipe on the foredeck?)

      Finally, for now anyway, there is no porta potti in the special locker, but the base of the locker has a moulded recess to take the toilet. Does anyone know which make and model will fit into that recess?

      Best regards, Tony.

    • olivershaw4229
      Tony, Congratulations on your new acquisition. I am currently away for the festive season, and will pick this up again when I return home, but a very quick
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 28, 2016
        Tony,

        Congratulations on your new acquisition.

        I am currently away for the festive season,  and will pick this up again when I return home,  but a very quick response to your enquiry about the anchor.

        Agreed,  bin the folding grapnel;   useless for anything other than as a weight (anchor dolly),  with the flukes folded and moused. 

        Much depends on what type of sailing you intend,  but for serious cruising I can warmly recommend my rig;   a 6 kg Rocna,  on 15 m of 8 mm chain spliced to 50 m of anchorplait.    The rode, together with the  trip line and buoy,  lives in the depression in the foredeck,  with the anchor itself on deck shackled to a U-bolt and also lashed to the pulpit.   I can take and upload a photo when I get back home.

        That is not cheap,  but it is very serious kit,  and if you are ever caught out in a situation where your safety depends on it you will be immensely thankful for having invested in the best available kit.      Just over two years ago I rode out a full force 9,  for several hours,  on a difficult (shingle) bottom in Ravenglass,  during the final stages of ex-Hurricane Bertha.    There was a very threatening concrete wall to leeward of me.   The anchor held impeccably.   'Nuff said!


        Oliver





      • Aart van der Pol
        Hi Tony, Right in the bows is a void space accessible through a small hatch at the end of the vee berths. Can this be utilised as a chain locker? (If I fit a
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 28, 2016
          Hi Tony,
          "Right in the bows is a void space accessible through a small hatch at the end of the vee berths. Can this be utilised as a chain locker? (If I fit a spurling pipe on the foredeck?)"

          yes you can, I use it exactely as you described. With not only the chain in  but also the rest of the cable. See the photo's
          Regards Aart

          2016-12-26 18:34 GMT+01:00 tony08baker@... [privateer20] <privateer20@...>:
           

          Seasons greetings one and all!

          I'm delighted to say that I have now bought a Privateer. 

          This is the one that used to belong to Sean Norris. A bermudan rigged version. The plate in the stern locker is from Midland Mouldings Ltd., Nottingham. This has the numbers 035  79. Would this indicate moulding 35 of 1979? The Small Craft, Blockley plate in the cockpit has a small stainless plate under it with the number 9541. I'm not able to guess what that number is.

          A couple of questions to be going on with :-

          The boat only has a small folding grapnel type anchor. I'll need something better, is there one that fits comfortably in the moulded depression in the foredeck? 

          Right in the bows is a void space accessible through a small hatch at the end of the vee berths. Can this be utilised as a chain locker? (If I fit a spurling pipe on the foredeck?)

          Finally, for now anyway, there is no porta potti in the special locker, but the base of the locker has a moulded recess to take the toilet. Does anyone know which make and model will fit into that recess?

          Best regards, Tony.


        • g2rywjymyuxj4ldb4cqgt4agkbmsexonybeqvszq
          Thanks Oliver and Aart for the anchor solutions. I was thinking that a good sized plough anchor would be the way to go, but that Rocna is an awful price
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 29, 2016
            Thanks Oliver and Aart for the anchor solutions.  I was thinking that a good sized plough anchor would be the way to go, but that Rocna is an awful price compared to a more ordinary anchor. I like Aart''s way of stowing the cable below deck rather than in the depression on the foredeck, but would still like to see how you stow your anchor whilst on passage Oliver. And a question for Aart, do you always carry your anchor stowed on the bow roller, and is that a plough type anchor?
            Regards, Tony.
          • olivershaw4229
            Will sort out a photo or two when I return home. If I remember correctly the Rocna is in the same price bracket as a genuine CQR anchor, but there are many
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 30, 2016
              Will sort out a photo or two when I return home.

              If I remember correctly the Rocna is in the same price bracket as a genuine CQR anchor,  but there are many generic plough anchors which are significantly cheaper.   Some of them work well,  and they may be good value for ordinary routine use;   the problem is that on difficult bottoms they may not always work as well,  because so much depends on the detail (sharpness of point,  weight distribution,  etc.).

              Additionally,  some of the cheaper ones are not as strong as the genuine article,  and bent or even fractured shanks are a known problem.    This is usually a matte of the quality of the steel used in the construction,   so that two different makes may look identical but one may be much stronger than the other.    Even Rocnas at one period are reported to have gone through a period when their shanks were made of an inferior steel,  after the company changed hands,  but I am reliably informed that this was some years ago and that all modern ones are fine. 

              For routine use a budget price anchor may be perfectly adequate;   but in emergency it may well be that only the best will do,  and certainly only the best will give peace of mind.

              My sailing club,  with my full agreement,  uses budget anchors on all our club boats;   but they never leave the Mersey,   the safety boats have reliable and are never left unattended at anchor (so if the anchor drags the engine can always be used to put the boat back on station),  and if a dinghy gets into trouble there is normally a safety boat available to assist,    For that sort of use a budget anchor is entirely appropriate.

              By contrast,  for my own boat I routinely sail mh further afield,  and often I am the only boat in the reasonable vicinity.   That is a different sort of sailing,  for which I prefer the security of having the best available ground tackle.

              Horses for courses,  or whatever the maritime equivalent of that may be.



              Oliver

               
            • Aart van der Pol
              Hi Tony, Indeed my achor is a plough type, and it is always stowed on the bow roller. As you can see on the photo I mailed, there is a small line around the
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 31, 2016
                Hi Tony,
                Indeed my achor is a plough type, and it is always stowed on the bow roller.
                As you can see on the photo I mailed, there is a small line around the anchor to secure the anchor there. (Since I never anchor on rocky grounds in the waddensea I almost never use a tripline.)
                Hope this helpes. Aart

                2016-12-29 19:57 GMT+01:00 tony08baker@... [privateer20] <privateer20@...>:
                 

                Thanks Oliver and Aart for the anchor solutions.  I was thinking that a good sized plough anchor would be the way to go, but that Rocna is an awful price compared to a more ordinary anchor. I like Aart''s way of stowing the cable below deck rather than in the depression on the foredeck, but would still like to see how you stow your anchor whilst on passage Oliver. And a question for Aart, do you always carry your anchor stowed on the bow roller, and is that a plough type anchor?

                Regards, Tony.


              • g2rywjymyuxj4ldb4cqgt4agkbmsexonybeqvszq
                Your comments are duly noted, Oliver. I suppose the maritime equivalent of horses for courses would be different ships different long splices . My memories
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 31, 2016
                  Your comments are duly noted, Oliver. I suppose the maritime equivalent of horses for courses would be 'different ships different long splices '.
                  My memories of the Mersey are from trading to QE Dock, Eastham on a product tanker, probably 15 years ago now, but I thought anchoring in the river needed plenty of chain when the tide was pouring out.


                • olivershaw4229
                  ... Yes, indeed: I had forgotten that one. Excellent. Oliver
                  Message 8 of 10 , 1 Jan 02:53
                    I suppose the maritime equivalent of horses for courses would be 'different ships different long splices '.

                    Yes,  indeed:   I had forgotten that one.

                    Excellent.




                    Oliver
                  • g2rywjymyuxj4ldb4cqgt4agkbmsexonybeqvszq
                    Hi Aart, When I studied you pictures again it became clear when I knew what I was looking for. You must be a great fan of the classic novel The Riddle of the
                    Message 9 of 10 , 1 Jan 05:27
                      Hi Aart,
                      When I studied you pictures again it became clear when I knew what I was looking for. 
                      You must be a great fan of the classic novel The Riddle of the Sands if the Wadden Sea is your cruising ground.

                    • Aart van der Pol
                      Riddle of the Sands is indeed in my library. Also movies, some even German made! Aart 2017-01-01 14:27 GMT+01:00 tony08baker@gmail.com [privateer20]
                      Message 10 of 10 , 4 Jan 01:48
                        Riddle of the Sands is indeed in my library.
                        Also movies, some even German made!
                        Aart

                        2017-01-01 14:27 GMT+01:00 tony08baker@... [privateer20] <privateer20@...>:
                         

                        Hi Aart,

                        When I studied you pictures again it became clear when I knew what I was looking for. 
                        You must be a great fan of the classic novel The Riddle of the Sands if the Wadden Sea is your cruising ground.


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