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Juliet;- Solo in the Solent

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  • johnturnerfm
    Evening all well last week my wife was away at work for a week and I found myself in a bit of a dilemma. Do I stay at home and paint the deck on the boat
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 12, 2015

      Evening all

      well last week my wife was away at work for a week and I found myself in a bit of a dilemma. Do I stay at home and paint the deck on the boat again, but it  is really to cold to paint or should I going sailing.


      this is part one of what I did.


      Solo in the solent Part 1

       

    • olivershaw4229
      Congratulations; I have just seen and enjoyed your Part 1. You certainly seem to have had the weather for it; it looked merely autumnal, rather than
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 12, 2015

        Congratulations;  I have just seen and enjoyed your Part 1.

         

        You certainly seem to have had the weather for it;   it looked merely autumnal,  rather than wintry,  with plenty of sunshine.    It looks about as enjoyable as was my own late autumn cruise into the Dee estuary,  which looking back I now regard as one of the high spots of last season.   And I see that there was,  very briefly,  one other yacht under sail to share the waters with you.


        And all those yachts in Yarmouth lying unused ...

         

        As an old hand,  and by way of being helpful,  perhaps I might make some suggestions which arise from your video.   Although I realise that there are a lot of points,  they are genuinely intended as enthusiastic positive suggestions,  and not at all as negative criticism.

         

         

         

        1.   Leaving a berth;    in this instance you had all the room in the world,  light wind,  and no wave action;  there may have been tide in the immediate vicinity of the berth but I could not assess that from the video.    So that seems to have been a very easy exit,  but in other conditions it could have been more difficult.

         

        I myself do not like motoring parallel to a pontoon (or,  even worse,  a wall) only inches away for any further than absolutely necessary,  because unless you have the benefit of either wind or tide actively taking you away from the pontoon it is all too easy for the boat to be deflected back into the pontoon and scrape her side.     And of course if you have moored boats ahead  -  which you were lucky enough not to have  -  you have to get further out anyway.

         

        So get yourself well away from the pontoon as early as possible.    Don’t be afraid to use the boathook to push the bows off before you start.    Alternatively,  rig a spring from the bow back to a cleat on the pontoon anywhere abaft of amidships;  then haul the tender up short and make sure that the painter cannot possibly foul the propeller,  and go slow ahead against the spring;    this will force the stern out from the pontoon,  then put the engine astern and slip the spring so that you can reverse out.   

         

        On a boat with a centrally mounted engine  (and it works well with the Privateer if you are moored port side to,  but obviously not when starboard side to),  you can do the opposite;  rig a spring forward from the quarter to a cleat on the pontoon anywhere forward of amidships,   again look to your dinghy painter (and other warps) to keep them well clear of the propeller,  and go astern against the spring.   That will force her head out,  slip the spring and go ahead,  and you are away.

         

        It is also worth mentioning that the forward end of the boat has very little grip on the water unless there is at least some keel down,  and if there is any cross wind it is all too easy for the wind to take charge.    I learned that the hard way about three years ago,  when in a stiff cross wind I left a pontoon and just could not get her to answer the helm under power,  and in restricted water I found myself getting rapidly into difficulties and in danger of being blown straight ashore.    The situation was resolved instantly when I dropped some keel,  and now as a matter of routine I always drop at least some keel before getting under way.

         

        Finally,  whatever length of painter you use for towing the dinghy at sea,  I would recommend heaving it in close when manoeuvring in a harbour or marina;    it just keeps things that much more under control.

         

         

         

        2.  Sailing under headsails only   It looks as though you may have already picked this up,  but I mention it just in case.    This is one of the few situations where the unusually far forward location of the drop keel on the Privateer is beneficial;   use the full depth of the drop keel,  and she should balance nicely under headsails alone.   


        Except when sailing under headsails alone,  the drop keel should never be more than half way down,  and use it as a trim tab to balance the aft skeg;    it is worth marking either the control rope or the winch wire/rope.  

         

        It is difficult to see from the video how much keel you had down,  but it looked as though it could have been all down while you were under headsails only,  which in that very special situation is how it should be.

         

        Although I think I detected the occasional purr of the engine! …

         

         

         

        3.  Mainsail hoisting and dropping     I note that you fold the main hatch right forward,  and this gives you convenient access forward.    Fine,  but you will lose this facility if you fit a sprayhood,  which I know you are interested in doing.    I deduce that you already have the main halliard led aft to the cockpit,  but if you do fit a sprayhood it would be worth also rigging a downhaul from the head of the sail which is similarly led aft to the ccopckpit,  so that you can drop the sail without the need to go forward.    By the same token,  have your reefing lines permanently rigged and led aft,  including lines through the tack cringles,  so that you can reef or shake out without needing to go forward;   I think that at 8:13 you had to reach forward to secure the tack reef cringle.   

         

        Incidentally at around 11:15 and onwards your main halliard seems to have slipped;   certainly there were an awful lot of wrinkles in the luff.   Then a little later I notice some major wrinkles in the foot,  suggesting a problem with the clew reefing line.    Neither helps either the efficiency or the appearance of the rig,  so it is worth checking that your cleats are not allowing the halliards and reefing lines to slip,  and also that the clew reefing line is pulling adequately aft as well as downwards.   For the latter,  think initially of a 45 degrees angle of pull,  and then adjust as necessary in the light of how the sail actually sets.

         

         

         

         

        4.  Radar Reflector    I note that you have one of the tubular ones.    May I suggest that you consider replacing this;    if cost is an issue then go for a traditional octahedral,  but if the budget will run to something better then perhaps either one of the Echomax ones or a Tri-lens type.   The MAIB/Qinetiq Report into the effectiveness of the various reflectors on the market makes interesting reading;  it is available online at a number of locations,  including http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/radar%20reflectors%20report.pdf .   Sadly,  the tubular ones came out not just worst,  by a long way,  of all the ones tested,  but absolutely abysmally.   (Says he,  who bought one for his GP14 dinghy two years before that test report was issued ...)

         

         

        5.  Nav Lights     Full marks that I could see the evidence of the sternlight,  so I presume that you have all the other required lights as well.    Don’t forget the anchor light,  and if you don’t already have one it is worth considering a tricolour for when you are sailing;   modern LED lights are particularly effective while at the same time being remarkably frugal with your precious battery power.

         

         

         

         

        Oliver


      • john turner
        Here is part 2 of 3 short videos of my first proper sail in my Privateer 20 Hope you enjoy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vC5GhOn6vyI On Thursday, 12 February
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 13, 2015
          Here is part 2 of 3 short videos of my first proper sail in my Privateer 20

          Hope you enjoy



          On Thursday, 12 February 2015, 20:13, "johnturnerfm@... [privateer20]" <privateer20@...> wrote:


           
          Evening all
          well last week my wife was away at work for a week and I found myself in a bit of a dilemma. Do I stay at home and paint the deck on the boat again, but it  is really to cold to paint or should I going sailing.

          this is part one of what I did.

           


        • olivershaw4229
          Congratulations on your Part 2. You are very obviously getting the hang of things, and having a great time despite the temperatures. Looking forward to
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 13, 2015
            Congratulations on your Part 2.

            You are very obviously getting the hang of things,  and having a great time despite the temperatures.

            Looking forward to meeting in the northwest in September.




            Oliver
          • johnturnerfm
            Hi Oliver Thanks again for all your advice and support. its all still very new to me, but I am loving every bit of it. the rebuilding of Juliet and the
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 13, 2015

              Hi Oliver


              Thanks again for all your advice and support. its all still very new to me, but I am loving every bit of it. the rebuilding of Juliet and the sailing, navigation etc.


              I have just started my VHF Radio coarse on line and hope to have that finished in the next 3 or 4 weeks and then in April I have my Day skipper theory coarse. so by September I might have a bit more of an idea.


              Thanks again

              John



            • olivershaw4229
              ... Excellent! I hope you will find no problems with the Day Skipper course, and certainly you give the impression of having a good grasp of things already,
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 13, 2015
                I have just started my VHF Radio coarse on line and hope to have that finished in the next 3 or 4 weeks and then in April I have my Day skipper theory course. so by September I might have a bit more of an idea.


                Excellent!

                I hope you will find no problems with the Day Skipper course,  and certainly you give the impression of  having a good grasp of things already,  but if you do find that you need a second opinion or a sounding board just ask.    However,  having said that,  that is assuming that I am not away sailing ...

                I confess that I can't help on the DSC aspects (to my mind the less important aspects) of the SRC/VHF course;    my own certificate is a long way pre-DSC, and one day I shall possibly upgrade it.   Meanwhile I don't currently own a DSC set,  and for the odd occasions when I operate the club's big RIB (which does have a DSC set) I take refuge in the fact that I have a certificate which licenses me to operate a VHF set and which makes no mention of restricting it to only certain classes (i.e. non-DSC) of such sets   ...




                Oliver
              • rrob437
                John I m loving your build updates and video it s great to see so much passion it s a tonic on these winter days and very motivational. Currently working on my
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 14, 2015
                  John

                  I'm loving your build updates and video it's great to see so much passion it's a tonic on these winter days and very motivational. Currently working on my tender but after a visit to next weeks boat jumble at Ardleigh I should have what I need to sort 'Bojangles'.

                  I simply have to ask you though, rather selfishly, how on earth did you make and affix those fantastic wooden window trims in the cabin. Very insipiring.

                  All the best and very well done sir.

                  Rob.
                • olivershaw4229
                  ... That reminds me of one of Neil Persadsingh s posts on another forum. “In another post I mentioned this guy who said that he had put in some bulkheads
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 14, 2015
                    I simply have to ask you though, rather selfishly, how on earth did you make and affix those fantastic wooden window trims in the cabin.


                    That reminds me of one of Neil Persadsingh's posts on another forum.    “In another post I mentioned this guy who said that he had put in some bulkheads on his boat and got his wife to help him.    He offered to post some pictures on the site of the bulkheads.   But everyone wanted to know how on earth do you get your wife to help you with boat things.

                     



                    Oliver
                  • rrob437
                    Ha too true Oliver. I m quite lucky in that mine insists on getting involved. Quite a girl of action my one. She made Bojangles curtains and is going to re
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 14, 2015
                      Ha too true Oliver. I'm quite lucky in that mine insists on getting involved. Quite a girl of action my one. She made 'Bojangles curtains and is going to re cover my cushions plus she just helped me today give the first coats to my re fibreglassed tender.

                      Here's to wives whether they help or simply allow us to love our other ladies of leisure!
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