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Drop Keel Overhaul

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  • olivershaw4229
    The time has come, the Walrus said ... I have just removed the pivot bolt (condemned as requiring immediate replacement) and partially removed the plate for
    Message 1 of 24 , Mar 8, 2015

      The time has come,  the Walrus said  ...


      I have just removed the pivot bolt (condemned as requiring immediate replacement) and partially removed the plate for inspection (pronounced fit for further service,  with no attention needed).   I intend at the same time to address the two well known issues of fountains of water coming into the cabin via the winch strop aperture when pounding into a head sea,  and the plate banging against the side of the case when rolling in a cross sea when at anchor or otherwise with with no sail up.


      In the course of doing this job I have discovered the safety device which is intended to prevent the plate dropping dangerously far in the event of failure of the winch strop (a second bolt,  working in a curved slot)   -  and have discovered that this same system also prevents the front of the plate being lowered out of the case when the back is fully housed;   so my external condition check on the bolt last year (jacking up the plate and assessing the amount of free movement) is not valid and could be dangerously misleading.   This second bolt also prevents the plate being fully removed unless it is also removed.


      At the same time,  prompted by having ridden out a severe storm last summer at anchor in a drying estuary with a shingle beach,  I intend to fit a metal keelband to protect the GRP.


      I am documenting this as work progresses,  with photos.   For those interested,  I have uploaded the file to date;  go to Files > Repair Techniques.


      I will periodically update this file as the work progresses.





      Oliver

    • rrob437
      This will be an interesting Oliver as I took need to fit a metal runner due to sitting on an oyster bed that dries out. As you said it has cleaned all the anti
      Message 2 of 24 , Mar 9, 2015
        This will be an interesting Oliver as I took need to fit a metal runner due to sitting on an oyster bed that dries out. As you said it has cleaned all the anti foul and inch up from the keel and caused some chipping to the gel coat exposing tiny amounts of glass fibre. I look forward to the progress.
      • olivershaw4229
        As a cautionary photo, perhaps I should post a photo on the Message Board of the pivot bolt which I have removed; other owners may wish to check theirs!!
        Message 3 of 24 , Mar 11, 2015
          As a cautionary photo,  perhaps I should post a photo on the Message Board of the pivot bolt which I have removed;    other owners may wish to check theirs!! 

          Although this point is discussed in the uploaded document,  it is also perhaps helpful to stress that the check that I made in all innocence last year is not a valid test.    With the boat on her trailer I jacked up the front of the plate and assessed the free movement,  perhaps 3 mm,  and decided that with a bolt of (I thought) 18 mm this indicated little if any wear,  so I did not draw the bolt.    Incidentally now that I have it out and so can measure it more easily I find that the actual bolt diameter is 5/8 inch,  or approx.  16 mm,  not 18 mm.

          I discovered this year,  after removing the bolt,  that if the aft end of the plate is fully housed and secured the front of it cannot drop;   it is prevented from doing so by the safety system that is designed to prevent the plate dropping dangerously far in the event of failure of the winch strop.    Thus the very small movement observed in my test last year was not limited by the pivot bolt,  but by the safety system, and the pivot bolt was in far worse condition than I had realised.

          Although I have chosen to lift my boat in slings,  this is so that I can do other work on her at the same time.   If removing and replacing the pivot bolt is the only work to be done that can be most conveniently done with the boat still on her trailer.

          And while on that subject,  chain plate (a.k.a. shroud plate) bolts should also be regularly drawn for inspection ...




          Oliver
        • olivershaw4229
          ... Failed, so photo album created instead. Photos Drop Keel Overhaul. For reasons known only to Yahoo, although I can include attachments to posts on
          Message 4 of 24 , Mar 11, 2015
            As a cautionary photo,  perhaps I should post a photo on the Message Board of the pivot bolt which I have removed;


            Failed,  so photo album created instead.   Photos > Drop Keel Overhaul.

            For reasons known only to Yahoo,  although I can include attachments to posts on certain other groups,  and the Group Settings on this group appear to permit it,  I am unable to post attachments here.



            Oliver
          • olivershaw4229
            For those who have been following the progress on this job, it is now very nearly finished. The drop keel has been partially removed, inspected, and found
            Message 5 of 24 , Mar 27, 2015
              For those who have been following the progress on this job,  it is now very nearly finished.

              The drop keel has been partially removed,  inspected,  and found to be in excellent condition,   and the pivot bolt has been replaced  -  not before time.    

              The gaping gap in the slot on either side of the plate has been filled,  and slot gasket has been fitted.   I hope and expect that these two upgrades will jointly stop the fountains of salt water emerging upwards through the aperture at the top of the case and into the cabin,  and the side padding should also eliminate the annoyance of the plate banging against the slot when the boat rolls in a cross sea.   
              We will have to wait and see whether there is a continuing banging problem due to the top of the plate or the region around the pivot bolt banging against the side of the case;   if that happens,  curing it may be somewhat more difficult,  but the Shipmate Owners' Association seem to think that this present upgrade will cure the problem.

              Brass keelband has been fitted to the central section of the keel while the boat is up in the slings,  and it should be possible to also fit it to the remaining part abaft the work currently done once the boat is lowered back onto her trailer.    The comparatively short and less vulnerable forward section may perhaps have to wait until I replace the trailer,  and can then tilt the boat back on the trailer.

              In deference to anno domini (mine,  not the boat's),  the winch has been fettled,  to make it physically easier for me to raise the plate.

              I have now updated the file on this job,   go to Files > Repair Techniques.

              I anticipate that there may be one further update once all the few remaining parts of the job are finished.




              Oliver
               
            • aartvanderpol@rocketmail.com
              Not all privateers have a second drop preventing bolt. I replaced my pivot bold by a stainless steal one a couple of years ago also by the same method Oliver
              Message 6 of 24 , Mar 27, 2015
                Not all privateers have a second drop preventing bolt.
                I replaced my pivot bold by a stainless steal one a couple of years ago also by the same method Oliver used. I removed the centerplate whoolly and applied epoxy on it.
                What struck me in the photo's is the place of the  pivot bolt. (on the photo's with red arrows.)
                Is the bolt really placed below the waterline?
                The bolt in my ship is placed above the waterline, some 7 cm above the V berths. So between the 2 V berths there is the centerplate case sticking out.
                There is in my ship ample reinforcement on that spot whereas there is none at yours?

                Screws through the laminate to fit the keel strips.... Is it possible that the wood that was once there behind has rotten away?

                Instead of carpet I used rubberstrip to fill the gap. The banging while rolling was diminished  but not completedly cured.

                Nicely done Oliver!
                Aart
              • olivershaw4229
                ... Is the bolt really placed below the waterline? That is an interesting query. I learn from the Shipmate Owners Association, and they are (smaller) sister
                Message 7 of 24 , Mar 27, 2015
                  What struck me in the photo's is the place of the  pivot bolt. (on the photo's with red arrows.)
                  Is the bolt really placed below the waterline?


                  That is an interesting query.

                  I learn from the Shipmate Owners' Association,  and they are (smaller) sister ships to the Privateers,  that in their case the design was changed part way through production;    the early ones had the pivot bolt below the waterline,  "in the keel"  according to their website,  but the later ones repositioned the bolt well above the waterline.    That in turn required a change in the profile of the plate.

                  I would not surprise me if the same is the case with the Privateers,  and at least two other factors lead me to believe that my one may be an early one;   the absence of built-in ballast beneath the cabin sole,  and the sail number which (if correct,  which is always fairly questionable unless supported by documentary evidence) appears to be P 1.

                  My pivot bolt is above the keel,  but not far above it,  and I suspect that it is below the waterline.    Certainly it is well below the Vee-berths.



                  Screws through the laminate to fit the keel strips.... Is it possible that the wood that was once there behind has rotten away?

                  I don't know.    I haven't lifted the floorboards yet this year;    I lifted them for inspection when I bought the boat some years ago,  and again more recently (but still a few years back) when I did did some GRP repairs,  but that is all,  so I am going by memory.    And I have seen (and worked on) a great many boats over the years ...
                  ]
                  But my slightly vague recollection is that on the inside there is a shallow trough (the inside of the keel),  with no wood (or indeed anything else) on the inside surface.    I will be able to confirm or amend that when I lift the floorboards after I have put the boat back on her trailer.

                  From the feel of the drill as it went through I did have the impression,  slightly surprisingly,  and perhaps worryingly,  that there are two layers of GRP in the keel with a space between.   From the date of the boat I rather doubt whether the construction is a foam sandwich,  or balsa sandwich,  but if the space between the two layers is a void one wonders why.

                  However I have never had any occasion to question the strength of the keel,  although I have occasionally had occasion to question the strength of the bilges;   certainly I can detect modest evidence of "give" as she dries out,   enough to make me aware,  but not enough to regard as necessarily excessive.    Of course all lightly constructed boats will do that,  and the Privateer is light for her size,  and provided all flexing remains well within the elastic limit that is not a structural problem.    Nonetheless,  it is on my agenda to consider stiffening the hull;   and also (for other reasons) stiffening the coachroof in way of the ventilators,  since there is evidence of flexing there also.    Along with replacing the forehatch and the main hatch ...

                  I am gradually getting the boat as I want her ...





                  Oliver





                • olivershaw4229
                  ... Another upgrade from the Shipmate Owners Association, Their boats do not have a second bolt to prevent the plate dropping dangerously far, and there are
                  Message 8 of 24 , Mar 28, 2015
                    Not all privateers have a second drop preventing bolt.



                    Another upgrade from the Shipmate Owners' Association,  

                    Their boats do not have a second bolt to prevent the plate dropping dangerously far,  and there are two possible serious risks should it ever be allowed to do so.   One is that if the plate is lowered too far there is insufficient remaining inside the case to give adequate lateral support,  particularly if the pivot bolt is sited low down;   this will be less of a problem with the higher position of the pivot bolt.     When the location of the pivot was changed on the Shipmates the blade was reprofiled,  and when fully lowered it now rested against the "headledge" of the case,  which was suitable strengthened.   I would expect that similar design changes would have been made with the Privateers,  but I have no confirmation of that.

                    If a boat has the pivot bolt in the lower location,  and does not have some means of preventing the plate being lowered too far,  this becomes a very serious risk.

                    The other risk is that if the winch strop should fail for any reason the falling plate could slam hard into the front of the slot and case,  or the "headledge" if present,   and the impact could do structural damage. There have been a (small) number of known cases where the strop has indeed failed,  allowing the plate to go crashing down.

                    A number of Shipmate Owners reduce this risk by a simple modification;  "The modification is to simply wedge some impact absorbing material between the leading edge of the keel and the keel box casing. Now readily available from DIY stores such as B&Q are impact absorbing rubber tiles that are used for impact attenuating surfacing beneath and around children’s play equipment."   This is glued in place.

                    Those members of this Group who choose to follow my recent suggestion (made for other reasons) of joining the Shipmate Owners' Association will be able to read up the details in their Handbook.





                    Oliver
                     
                  • Jonathan Knight
                    My boat doesn t have the second keel bolt although the plate has a semicircular slot which I suspect was for this bolt. I dropped my plate out last spring and
                    Message 9 of 24 , Mar 28, 2015

                      My boat doesn't have the second keel bolt although the plate has a semicircular slot which I suspect was for this bolt.
                      I dropped my plate out last spring and was a little perplexed at the lack of a bolt. Especially as the sales brochure refers to a safety device.
                      Fortunately the keel is pivoted from the top of the casing and this appears adequately strong.
                      The addition of a rubber stop in the front of the keelslot sounds a sensible idea provided it doesn't interfere with the forward position of the keel which is very useful if sailing / manouvering under jib or foresail alone.

                      Out of interest I found that from fully up each turn of the winch drum very approximately equalled 8° so that 5.5 turns tales the keel to 45°.

                      Regards Jonathan

                      On 28 Mar 2015 17:45, "acapella13934@... [privateer20]" <privateer20@...> wrote:
                       

                      Not all privateers have a second drop preventing bolt.




                      Another upgrade from the Shipmate Owners' Association,  

                      Their boats do not have a second bolt to prevent the plate dropping dangerously far,  and there are two possible serious risks should it ever be allowed to do so.   One is that if the plate is lowered too far there is insufficient remaining inside the case to give adequate lateral support,  particularly if the pivot bolt is sited low down;   this will be less of a problem with the higher position of the pivot bolt.     When the location of the pivot was changed on the Shipmates the blade was reprofiled,  and when fully lowered it now rested against the "headledge" of the case,  which was suitable strengthened.   I would expect that similar design changes would have been made with the Privateers,  but I have no confirmation of that.

                      If a boat has the pivot bolt in the lower location,  and does not have some means of preventing the plate being lowered too far,  this becomes a very serious risk.

                      The other risk is that if the winch strop should fail for any reason the falling plate could slam hard into the front of the slot and case,  or the "headledge" if present,   and the impact could do structural damage. There have been a (small) number of known cases where the strop has indeed failed,  allowing the plate to go crashing down.

                      A number of Shipmate Owners reduce this risk by a simple modification;  "The modification is to simply wedge some impact absorbing material between the leading edge of the keel and the keel box casing. Now readily available from DIY stores such as B&Q are impact absorbing rubber tiles that are used for impact attenuating surfacing beneath and around children’s play equipment."   This is glued in place.

                      Those members of this Group who choose to follow my recent suggestion (made for other reasons) of joining the Shipmate Owners' Association will be able to read up the details in their Handbook.





                      Oliver
                       
                    • olivershaw4229
                      ... Further to my previous reply, not yet appeared, on reflection these two features may be incompatible. It could well be that if the design changed part
                      Message 10 of 24 , Mar 28, 2015
                        My boat doesn't have the second keel bolt although the plate has a semicircular slot which I suspect was for this bolt.  ...   Fortunately the keel is pivoted from the top of the casing and this appears adequately strong.




                        Further to my previous reply,  not yet appeared,  on reflection these two features may be incompatible.    It could well be that if the design changed part way through the production run the builder used up existing stock of plates,  with the slot already cut,  but repositioned the pivot.

                        Unless the pivot is at the centre of the arc of the slot you won't be able to use a safety bolt,  and will have to devise some alternative safety system.



                        Oliver
                      • olivershaw4229
                        ... It would be worth having a look underneath the tops of the Vee-berths to see whether you have the hole in the case. If so, it would seem that at some
                        Message 11 of 24 , Mar 28, 2015
                          My boat doesn't have the second keel bolt although the plate has a semicircular slot which I suspect was for this bolt. 


                          It would be worth having a look underneath the tops of the Vee-berths to see whether you have the hole in the case.     If so,  it would seem that at some point in the life of your boat the bolt has been removed and not replaced,   and in that case it would seem sensible to reinstate it.




                          Oliver
                        • Jonathan Knight
                          I have just compared our plates. Mine is quite different at the front / top with the pivot hole just below the slot and no where near the centre of arc of the
                          Message 12 of 24 , Mar 28, 2015

                            I have just compared our plates. Mine is quite different at the front / top with the pivot hole just below the slot and no where near the centre of arc of the slot. So I think you are quite right in that the original plates were just re -cut with the slot becoming redundant.
                            I have tried to upload a couple of pictures to Geolia's photo album but I can't see them in the file.
                            I'm glad the pivot hole isn't at the bottom of the plate as there must be a great risk of water ingress with that design.
                            Regards Jonathan

                            On 28 Mar 2015 19:52, "acapella13934@... [privateer20]" <privateer20@...> wrote:
                             

                            My boat doesn't have the second keel bolt although the plate has a semicircular slot which I suspect was for this bolt. 



                            It would be worth having a look underneath the tops of the Vee-berths to see whether you have the hole in the case.     If so,  it would seem that at some point in the life of your boat the bolt has been removed and not replaced,   and in that case it would seem sensible to reinstate it.




                            Oliver
                          • olivershaw4229
                            ... I have just seen that there is a photo of a later type of plate in the Celena album - Arne Rudstrom s boat. That is a very different profile from
                            Message 13 of 24 , Mar 29, 2015
                              I have just compared our plates. Mine is quite different at the front / top with the pivot hole just below the slot and no where near the centre of arc of the slot. So I think you are quite right in that the original plates were just re -cut with the slot becoming redundant.


                              I have just seen that there is a photo of a later type of plate in the Celena album  -  Arne Rudstrom's boat.     That is a very different profile from mine,  and from your description it seems that your one is somewhere between the two.

                              The "front" edge on Arne's one is very sharply cut back and makes an angle of 28 degrees to the "top"edge,  so far as I can measure it onscreen,  and there is no slot seen.   Clearly the pivot point is near the top of the plate,  and on the bisector of the "top" and "front" edges.

                              My one has a "front" edge much closer to the vertical (when the plate is housed),  indeed it may even be vertical,  although I have not lowered the plate sufficiently to be sure of that.    The pivot is near the bottom,  and again is probably on the bisector of the "front" and "bottom" edges,  and the slot for the safety bolt is clearly visible.

                              Both very different plates are shown,  suitably rotated for the best comparison,  in the attached composite photo.



                              I have tried to upload a couple of pictures to Geolia's photo album but I can't see them in the file.

                              I did wonder whether this was just delay in transmissionn,  as sometimes happens,  but they are still not there.    Perhaps you might like to try again.



                              Oliver
                            • olivershaw4229
                              As before, attachment has not come through. Have now created a new Photo Album for Drop Keel Profiles. Oliver
                              Message 14 of 24 , Mar 29, 2015
                                As before,  attachment has not come through.

                                Have now created a new Photo Album for Drop Keel Profiles.




                                Oliver
                              • jonathan_llanover
                                Just managed to upload pictures of Geolia s keel to the new keel album. Have also uploaded a photo of the splash guard on Geolia s keel housing. This seems to
                                Message 15 of 24 , Mar 30, 2015
                                  Just managed to upload pictures of Geolia's keel to the new keel album.
                                  Have also uploaded a photo of the splash guard on Geolia's keel housing. This seems to work well even though the top of the housing is open. It would be a simple matter to add a rubber seal to the top of this housing though I haven't found this necessary.

                                  regards Jonathan
                                • olivershaw4229
                                  Thanks for that. Your keel does indeed look to be an intermediate stage in the evolution, and I very much suspect that it started life as an early one -
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Mar 30, 2015
                                    Thanks for that.

                                    Your keel does indeed look to be an intermediate stage in the evolution,  and I very much suspect that it started life as an early one  -  hence the slot  -  and when the pivot point was moved the builder simply used existing stock items and cut off the "front" edge at the appropriate angle.

                                    However the "back" edge appears to be more rounded and appears to go deeper when lowered than the one on Arne's boat;   so we have at least three different keel designs,  and quite possibly also three different draughts when the keels are fully lowered!




                                    Oliver 
                                  • aartvanderpol@rocketmail.com
                                    I think that without an extra safety bolt there is enough safety given by the dropping line. I have heard of a Drascombe with broken bolt. They where already
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Mar 30, 2015
                                      I think that without an extra safety bolt there is enough safety given by the dropping line. I have heard of a Drascombe with broken bolt. They where already motoring back to the place they thought they lost their plate. Finally they discovered that the dropping line had been strong enough to drag the plate several km's while they were searching for their plate! It had remained below their boat all the way....
                                      Aart
                                      My dropping keel looks like jonathan's but without the extra slit.
                                    • olivershaw4229
                                      ... The Shipmate Owners Association report that, although not common, they do know of occasional instances of that line failing. The safety bolt (on the
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Mar 30, 2015
                                        I think that without an extra safety bolt there is enough safety given by the dropping line



                                        The Shipmate Owners' Association report that,  although not common,  they do know of occasional instances of that line failing.     The safety bolt (on the earlier models) is there partly for that reason,  as well as to guard against operator error in lowering the plate so far that there is inadequate lateral support.   The latter risk will presumably not be an issue for yourself and Jonathan,  with the higher position of the pivot.

                                        Of course the first protection against the line failing (or indeed its attachment points at either end) is good maintenance,  and we have no information on the quality of maintenance of the boats where it has failed.

                                        A safety bolt,  or a buffer against the "headledge" is only belt and braces.

                                        But in my book there is a valid case for belt and braces ...





                                        Oliver

                                      • aartvanderpol@rocketmail.com
                                        Indeed my dropping line failed once in a heavy sea. This was due to a aluminium clam on the steel line. (It shoot have been copper.) Since I entered shallow
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Apr 1, 2015
                                          Indeed my dropping line failed once in a heavy sea. This was due to a aluminium clam on the steel line. (It shoot have been copper.)  Since I entered shallow water the keel was banging on the ground so I needed to lift it as soon as possible. After some fiddling with extra lines under the boat I managed to get the plate half way up and, on return in the harbour, could by diving get a line trough the hole to get the plate fully up.
                                          Since the steel line is now clammed correctly and controlled regularly I do not expect any more failing dropping lines. (Only the line that goes down is of steel.)
                                          Aart
                                        • Jonathan Knight
                                          My dropping line is only 5mm polyester /nylon though I have just renewed it. The old one could have been original for all I know! Jonathan On 1 Apr 2015 10:04,
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Apr 1, 2015

                                            My dropping line is only 5mm polyester /nylon though I have just renewed it. The old one could have been original for all I know!
                                            Jonathan

                                            On 1 Apr 2015 10:04, "aartvanderpol@... [privateer20]" <privateer20@...> wrote:
                                             

                                            Indeed my dropping line failed once in a heavy sea. This was due to a aluminium clam on the steel line. (It shoot have been copper.)  Since I entered shallow water the keel was banging on the ground so I needed to lift it as soon as possible. After some fiddling with extra lines under the boat I managed to get the plate half way up and, on return in the harbour, could by diving get a line trough the hole to get the plate fully up.
                                            Since the steel line is now clammed correctly and controlled regularly I do not expect any more failing dropping lines. (Only the line that goes down is of steel.)
                                            Aart

                                          • olivershaw4229
                                            ... Aluminium is normally regarded as the correct ferrule material on galvanised or bright steel wire, no doubt because the materials are adjacent in the
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Apr 1, 2015
                                              Indeed my dropping line failed once in a heavy sea. This was due to a aluminium clam on the steel line. (It shoot have been copper.)  


                                              Aluminium is normally regarded as the correct ferrule material on galvanised or bright steel wire,  no doubt because the materials are adjacent in the galvanic table.    Nonetheless,  they can and do corrode ...   ...

                                              Copper is usually regarded as the appropriate ferrule material for stainless steel wire (although Talurit also manufacture stainless ferrules).   Surprisingly,  although the materials are a long way apart in the galvanic table these splices seem in practice to be almost immune to corrosion.

                                              However stainless steel wire is very susceptible to fatigue failure,  particularly where it bends through tight radii under load,  so it is important to periodically check it very carefully for evidence of broken strands,  and replace if any are found.    Some authorities recommend replacing on a time basis anyway.    Locations to check in particular include the eye splices (and indeed any alternative terminations),  and in the case of the winch strop the part of the length which is wound around the winch axle  -  the latter of course means most of the length of the wire!

                                              It is also important that wire of the correct construction for flexibility around tight turns is chosen for the winch wire;     I think that is probably 1 x 19 construction,  but I stress that I have not checked that point.    Wire intended for halliards should be suitable,  that intended for shrouds is not.

                                              Incidentally similar requirements for regular checks apply to the standing rigging,  and it is even more important there.

                                              On my boat the winch strop is rope rather than wire,  probably changed by a previous owner,  and that works well but it has its own different risk factors,  and its own requirements requirements for inspection and maintenance.



                                              Oliver
                                            • chris_bub
                                              Hello together, now I build out the keel of our boot also. I upload some photos to the “Droop Keel Profiles” – Album. There is only one pivot bolt, made
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Apr 3, 2015

                                                Hello together,

                                                now I build out the keel of our boot also. I upload some photos to the “Droop Keel Profiles” – Album.

                                                There is only one pivot bolt, made of stainless steel. It looks very god. Also it was no problem to pull it out. The dropping line is a stainless steel line, also the shackle to fasten the line to the keel. With the dropping line it is very easy to lift or lower the keel when the pivot bolt is removed. The attachment of the line is nearly in the center of gravity.

                                                The pivot bolt is fasten 11 cm above the waterline. It seems that some steel or iron plates welded on the keel.


                                                Greetings from germany

                                                Christian

                                              • olivershaw4229
                                                Chris, Would you like to add the details of your boat to the Boat Register? Since you are working in a second language I suggest that it might be easiest for
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Apr 3, 2015
                                                  Chris,

                                                  Would you like to add the details of your boat to the Boat Register?

                                                  Since you are working in a second language I suggest that it might be easiest for you to email the details to me,  and I can then input them to the system.    But have a look first at the current file to see what sort of information we are listing.





                                                  Oliver
                                                • olivershaw4229
                                                  ... Files Boat Register.xlsx Oliver
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Apr 3, 2015
                                                    Would you like to add the details of your boat to the Boat Register?

                                                    Files > Boat Register.xlsx




                                                    Oliver
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