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Re: [warrebeekeeping] Re: dead bees

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  • Madhupran
    On 8 May 2012, at 08:42, John ... John, It s the same here, acres of rape but quite a mix of pollen coming in when the bees can
    Message 1 of 18 , May 8, 2012
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      On 8 May 2012, at 08:42, "John" <johnhaverson@...>
      >
      > This year, we are also surrounded by hundreds of acres of rape. I know one farmer sprays with Apistan despite being keen on conserving all types of pollinator (pressure for profit). On Sunday, I was shocked to see on BBC's 'Countryfile' that rape seed is now also being c
      > Thankfully my colonies seem to be collecting a variety of pollen from rosemary, bluebells and dandelion as well as trees; I have not noticed much rape pollen but the unseasonally cool weather might be restricting the plant's nectar production.
      >
      >

      John, It's the same here, acres of rape but quite a mix of pollen coming in when the bees can fly.
      I think one hive was a bit overcome by the sudden sunshine on Sunday, it didn't last long but they suddenly formed a big beard at the entrance, as soon as the sun went they were all inside again. This is a hive on a double national brood box still with some empty top bars so quite a bit of space.

      Patrick
      Quantocks
      Southwest England

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    • dachewitt
      Katie, Sorry to hear of your bees. This article shows more instances of suspected pesticide poisoning. Hope you can determine the cause.
      Message 2 of 18 , May 8, 2012
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        Katie,

        Sorry to hear of your bees. This article shows more instances of suspected pesticide poisoning. Hope you can determine the cause.

        http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2012/05/06/four-days-in-april-deadly-for-bees.html

        Best wishes,
        Debbie in Maryland
        Lat. 38.84 N, USDA zone 7




        --- In warrebeekeeping@..., "David Heaf" <david@...> wrote:
        >
        > Katie wrote: "I haven't been on here for over a year! so I maybe don't
        > deserve your advice?"
        >
        > Welcome back! We attach no conditions to advice given here. :-)
        >
        > Katie: "Does any one have a clue what might have happened??!"
        >
        > You say they had adequate stores and that oilseed rape (OSR) is nearby which
        > would lead me to suspect pesticide poisoning. At low doses of pesticide,
        > bees often fail to navigate back to the hive so the hive population would
        > dwindle. Those that do get back bring pesticide with them and feed it to the
        > rest.
        >
        > It would be worth doing three things:
        >
        > 1. Remove the combs and examine the cells for signs of brood disease. Your
        > local inspecctor could help with this, or you could download the booklets on
        > the National Bee Unit website and compare with photos. At a push, and if you
        > post excellent quality macro photos in the Group's photo section, this group
        > might be able to give an opinion.
        >
        > 2. Locate the farmer and ask for an empty seed bag. Usually the seed
        > treatment would be on the bag. Ask what spraying program he uses and when he
        > sprays. Check for any other OSR plots within foraging range. The median
        > range is 1.7 km.
        >
        > 3. If it does look like pesticide poisoning, check of your local BKA has a
        > system for recording it. Let the local inspector know. Check that the
        > pesticide has been used within the conditions of its license etc.
        > __________________________________________
        >
        > David Heaf North-West Wales, UK
        > Warré & 'National' hives at 30 metres OMSL
        > Warré beekeeping English web portal:
        > http://warre.biobees.com/index.html
        > David Heaf's beekeeping pages:
        > http://www.bee-friendly.co.uk
        > __________________________________________
        >
      • reader.englefield@btinternet.com
        Patrick, please advise this newbee; I have 3 Warré hives and my first hive, a national. I want to make it a double brood box like the one you mention. Should
        Message 3 of 18 , May 8, 2012
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          Patrick, please advise this newbee; I have 3 Warré hives and my first hive, a national. I want to make it a double brood box like the one you mention. Should I put the new empty brood box under the existing one, or on top of it. Thanks for any advice.

          Reader Englefield, Hamapshire


          ------------------------------------------------------------------

          This is a hive on a double national brood box still with some empty top bars so quite a bit of space.
          >
          > Patrick
          > Quantocks
          > Southwest England
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Madhupran
          ... Reader, Well I think I am right in saying there is nothing to stop you putting the box underneath whatever the circumstances but what I was describing was
          Message 4 of 18 , May 8, 2012
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            On 8 May 2012, at 14:56, "reader.englefield@..." <reader.englefield@...> wrote:

            > Patrick, please advise this newbee; I have 3 Warré hives and my first hive, a national. I want to make it a double brood box like the one you mention. Should I put the new empty brood box under the existing one, or on top of it. Thanks for any advice.
            >
            > Reader Englefield, Hamapshire
            >
            > ----------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >
            Reader,

            Well I think I am right in saying there is nothing to stop you putting the box underneath whatever the circumstances but what I was describing was a double brood box with only top bars, no frames in, so the bees built comb down through the whole depth of the two boxes and did so straight away. If your bees have been in one box for a while with or without frames they may not immediately build down further. When they do build down that will be one great big brood nest probably too heavy and fragile to lift or move. My plan is if they need more space to super when there is a flow on with the hope that due to the size of the brood nest this is not too disruptive or to perhaps harvest a side comb. It is a way for the bees to have an undisturbed, large brood area with combs uninterrupted by top bars.

            But the simple answer to your question is put it underneath!

            Patrick
            Quantocks
            South West England
            >
            >


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          • David Heaf
            Patrick wrote: ...what I was describing was a double brood box with only top bars, no frames in, so the bees built comb down through the whole depth of the
            Message 5 of 18 , May 8, 2012
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              Patrick wrote: "...what I was describing was a double brood box with only
              top bars, no frames in, so the bees built comb down through the whole depth
              of the two boxes and did so straight away. "

              Can't think why I've not tried this. I have 10 redundant National broods
              lying
              around. How soon did your colony fill the two boxes? Presumably with some
              care, and
              the Warré comb knife, the whole lot should be inspectable?

              Do you have a top-bar cloth and quilt under the roof?
              __________________________________________

              David Heaf North-West Wales, UK
              Warré & 'National' hives at 30 metres OMSL
              Warré beekeeping English web portal:
              http://warre.biobees.com/index.html
              David Heaf's beekeeping pages:
              http://www.bee-friendly.co.uk
              __________________________________________
            • Madhupran
              On 8 May 2012, at 17:38, David Heaf wrote ... Both colonies (swarms from last year cant remember which month they were hived and not
              Message 6 of 18 , May 8, 2012
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                On 8 May 2012, at 17:38, "David Heaf" <david@...> wrote
                >
                > Can't think why I've not tried this. I have 10 redundant National broods
                > lying
                > around. How soon did your colony fill the two boxes? Presumably with some
                > care, and
                > the Warré comb knife, the whole lot should be inspectable?
                >
                > Do you have a top-bar cloth and quilt under the roof?
                > __________________________________________
                >
                Both colonies (swarms from last year cant remember which month they were hived and not at home to check) built exactly 8 bars across after hiving and then stopped. The combs are now various depths, some very substantial but they have yet to use the remaining top bars. With a long enough comb knife they could be inspected in the same way as a warre. All I've done is move the boxes off the floor, lain on the ground and looked up into them (I have quite high stands). Yes they have top bar cloths and quilts. They have standard (deep) national roof's (actually I extended one to make it deep enough to cover the quilt) and i did wonder if the non warre roof contributed to one hive heating up so quickly in a brief burst of sun that it formed a big beard but that may just be with a lot of bees they just could not adjust to the temperature change quick enough or maybe they just went out to see this weird bright light they'd not seen before!

                I've got another one waiting for a swarm, will be interesting to see how they go.

                Patrick
                Quantocks
                South West England

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              • David Heaf
                Katie sent me a couple of good photos of combs from her deadout. I have put them in her album katie s bees in the Group s photos section
                Message 7 of 18 , May 9, 2012
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                  Katie sent me a couple of good photos of combs from her deadout. I have put
                  them in her album 'katie's bees' in the Group's photos section

                  http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/warrebeekeeping/photos/

                  which puts the photos in the context of her hive setup.

                  Would anyone like to make some observations or suggest a diagnosis?
                  __________________________________________

                  David Heaf North-West Wales, UK
                  Warré & 'National' hives at 30 metres OMSL
                  Warré beekeeping English web portal:
                  http://warre.biobees.com/index.html
                  David Heaf's beekeeping pages:
                  http://www.bee-friendly.co.uk
                  __________________________________________
                • Md Schwartz
                  Link was broke, so went the yahoo updates route--- a hint of k-wing perhaps? Haven t seen it in awhile, but that s what it reminds me of. Margie AKusa
                  Message 8 of 18 , May 9, 2012
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                    Link was broke, so went the yahoo updates route--- a hint of k-wing perhaps? Haven't seen it in awhile, but that's what it reminds me of.


                    Margie AKusa



                    ________________________________
                    From: David Heaf <david@...>

                    Katie sent me a couple of good photos of combs from her deadout. I have put

                    them in her album 'katie's bees' in the Group's photos section

                    http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/warrebeekeeping/photos/

                    which puts the photos in the context of her hive setup.

                    Would anyone like to make some observations or suggest a diagnosis?




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